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Gjest David Larson

[#20798] Where is 'Strondjem Steft' in Møre og Romsdal?

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Gjest David Larson

I have recently been contacted by someone who may be related to me. She is descended from Lars Loken who was born in Strondjem Steft in 1850. I have an ancestor named Haagen Johnsen Loken, who in the 1865 census of 1548 Frænen has a brother named Lars born about 1849. Both of these men ended up for some time in Wisconsin in USA.I am wondering if Strondjem Steft is located anywhere near Frænen, or near Løken, Sundal where Haagen was born. It would be nice to determine that these two were in fact brothers.My information about Haagen Johnsen Loken is at my website at: LenkeThank you in advance for your help.David

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Gjest Knut Bryn

At first I have to clear up a little. 1. 'Strondhjem Steft' obviously is wrong for 'Trondhjem Stift' (perhaps written Steft in some documents). 2. Trondhjems Stift is not a place name, but means 'Trondhjem bishopric'. Until the 1980s it covered the districts of Nord-Trøndelag, Sør-Trøndelag and the northern part of Møre og Romsdal.Then to your hypothesis. I can confirm that Fræna (Frænen) was a part of Trondhjem Stift. However, there are several farms or subfarms called Løken in Trondhiem Stift, - and I presume that Lars had his name from a farm. Therefore you need some more information about Lars to prove that he was a brother of Haagen.

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Gjest Ketil Harbek

'Strondjem Steft' must be 'Søndre Trondhjems Stift'. 'Stift' is diocese - here probably meaning county (earlier 'amt', now 'fylke'). Today this is Sør-Trøndelag fylke (county). Møre og Romsdal is the nabour county to the south west. Fræna and Sunndal are municipalities ('kommuner') in Møre og Romsdal.

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Gjest Ivar S. Ertesvåg

Well... there was no 'Søndre Trondhjems Stift'. The diocese was 'Trondhjems Stift', from 1917(?) 'Nidaros bispedøme', and comprised 'Nordre Trondhjems Amt' (from 1917(?): Nord-Trøndelag fylke), 'Søndre Trondhjems Amt' (Sør-Trøndelag fylke), and (to about 1980) the northern part of 'Romsdals Amt', (Møre fylke, later Møre og Romsdal fylke).

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Gjest Knut Bryn

I forgot to mention one crucial detail. Lars Johnsen Løken, - the brother of Haagen, was born in Sunndal. Therefore it is good for you to know that Sunndal parish also was a part of Trondhjem Stift in the 19th century.I will add that I have had a look at your website and the impressive collection of information about Haagen. In the ship list 'Molde' is recorded as the birth place for both Haagen and Lars. This must be wrong. Molde is the neigbour town of Fræna where these brothers lived before departure to America. I think that this is the reason while Molde is used in these records.In my first message I wrote that you need more information about 'Lars Loken' to be sure that he was the brother of Haagen. This is still true, but I now see that quite many facts points towards this hypothesis.

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Gjest David Larson

Thanks for all the help. I was given information that now makes certain that Haagen and Lars were brothers -- see 1923 biography of Lars Loken: LenkeIs there any way to find out information about a Gustave Loken, born August 1875 and came to Norway in 1884? He shows up around Haagen & Lars families, but is too old to be their children and is not their brother, and unfortunately is too late for the 1865 census.Also, Haagen & Lars had a sister/brother named 'Ever'? Is this a Norwegian name or nickname?By the way, I agree with what was said about Molde. I am sure that Sunndal is the birthplace, and there is a Løken farm community there.Thanks again in advance.

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Gjest Lars Steinar Hansen

'Ever' is not a Norwegian name. Could it be 'Even'? Or even (!) better: 'Iver'? The pronounciation of 'Ever' en english corresponds to 'Iver' in norwegian.Other names used by this family are Erik and Endre.

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Gjest Kjell Hamberg

I have no problem with recognizing 'Ever' as a norwegian name - in America, that is. In Norway, Ever would be Iver or Ivar. Using an 'E' instead of an 'I', he made sure the pronounciation of his name didn't change.(I know of people who changed their family name from Iversen to Everson for the same reason).Kjell Hamberg

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Gjest Agnete Schjønsby

Ever could also be an 'anglification' of 'Evert'. Just cutting a letter seems easy enough? Not a very common name, but 69 males with this first name in 1865. If this is correct, it narrows the search down compared to Ivar/Iver. Agnete

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Gjest per helge seglsten

If 'Ever' appears in an american source I agree it could be Iver or Ivar (or Evert) but if it appears in a norwegian source I think it's just an old spelling (or misspelling) of Evert. There is the same varation in spelling of names like Siver/Sivert and Syver/Syvert.

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