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Astrid Haugland

Johnna Moe og brannen. Kvar kom Johanna frå?

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Astrid Haugland

Johanna Moe (1868 - 20 Okt 1911) var gift med John (Johannes) Iverson Skurdahl (1859 - 25 Mai 1918)

Dei hadde 12 barn.

Johanna omkom i ein tragisk brann i Warren, Minnesota, 1911.

Ho hadde ei søster i USA, Christine Langager, f. Moe og kanske ein bror.

John kom frå Skurdal i Sør-Fron i Gudbrandsdalen.

 

Men kor Johanna Moe kom ifrå skulle eg gjerne vilja veta.

 

Kan nokon hjelpa?

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059228/1911-10-26/ed-1/seq-1/#date1=1836&index=14&rows=20&words=SKURDAHL+Skurdahl&searchType=basic&sequence=0&state=&date2=1922&proxtext=Skurdahl&y=0&x=0&dateFilterType=yearRange&page=1

 

http://www.astridhaugland.net/tng/getperson.php?personID=I294&tree=tree1

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Ann-Mary Engum

Christine M. Langager

  •  

Birth: Mar. 6, 1864Death: Sep. 20, 1932

Traill County

North Dakota, USAtrans.gif

 Burial:

Clifford Cemetery 

Clifford

Traill County

North Dakota, USA 

Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?

Created by: lk51t

Record added: Jun 10, 2009 

Find A Grave Memorial# 38153460

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=langager&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSob=n&GRid=38153460&df=all&

Prøver å nøste via søsteren til Johanna.

 

 

Christine Langager
United States Census, 1930
Name Christine Langager Event Type Census Event Date 1930 Event Place Mayville, Traill, North Dakota, United States Gender Female Age 66 Marital Status Married Race White Race (Original) White Relationship to Head of Household Wife Relationship to Head of Household (Original) Wife Birth Year (Estimated) 1864 Birthplace Norway Immigration Year 1885 Father's Birthplace Norway Mother's Birthplace Norway Sheet Letter A Sheet Number 4
HOUSEHOLD ROLE GENDER AGE BIRTHPLACE

 

Maudine Langager

Head M 67 Norway

 

Christine Langager

Wife F 66 Norway

 

Elmer M Langager

Son M 35 North Dakota

https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XKVV-95S

 

----

 

Mandius T. Langager

 

Birth:  Mar. 13, 1863 Death:  Jun. 5, 1933

Traill County

North Dakota, USA trans.gif   Burial:

Clifford Cemetery 

Clifford

Traill County

North Dakota, USA  

Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]  

Created by: lk51t

Record added: Jun 10, 2009 

Find A Grave Memorial# 38153475

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=langager&GSiman=1&GScid=101815&GRid=38153475&

Mr. Mandius T. Langager was born at Karmoy, Skudeness, Stovanger, Norway in 1863. His parents were Torbjorn and Ellen Kjerstine Langager. He completed his education at about age 19. He then was an apprenticed seaman of a commercial fishing fleet.

In 1885 Mandius (M.T.) immigrated to America where there was more opportunity for advancement. He went directly to Clifford, where many of his friends had settled. He worked for a farmer, Mr. Mons Knutson.

Here he met Kristine Moe, who had come to America with her brother from Gulbrandsdalen, Norway. She was born in 1864 and came here in 1885. A sister and the parents came later. Mandius and Kristine were married in March 1887.

After their marriage, they moved to the Portland area and rented a quarter of land. By 1885 all available land in the area had been settled. They had seven children

1.     Tolles,

2.     Clara,

3.     Miller,

4.     Elmer,

5.     Olga,

6.     Minnie, and

7.     Henry.

While they resided here the two older children, Tolles and Clara, attended Bruflat Academy at Portland, a church school, where the children could stay at a dormitory. County rural schools were then built and the children transferred to country schools.

Needing more land to farm, Mr. Langager and his wife moved to the Blabon-Hope area in the spring of 1900. They lived on the northeast corner of section 12 adjoining the southwest corner of Blabon. The house to which the family moved was typical of the homes at that time

it consisted of one large room plus a leanto kitchen and entry.

While they lived there the mail came as far as Hope. Langager was appointed postmaster and the post office was in his home. The mail was carried from Hope by his son, Tolles, by bicycle in summer and horse and sled in winter. The neighbors came to pick up their mail.

At this time the cattle grazed the fields - many coyotes were still in the area. One day a pack of coyotes chased the cattle and Mr. Langager heard the noise and knew what was happening. He snatched his gun and ran outside. To avoid being trampled, he leaped to the top of a water tank and shot one shot into the air. At once the coyotes left.

The Langagers then moved to a farm in Hugo Township. The farm was later owned by the Ben Nelson family. The children attended Hugo School #1.

During this time rural mail delivery service and telephone service came to the community. Mr. and Mrs. John Lind carried the mail for many, many years. They traveled the route with horses and later used automobiles, often the car would break down midroute and the Linds would finish the route on foot.

The family settled again on the J. A. White farm between Blabon and Hope. This is the farm now occupied by the Edward Edwardson family. To begin with, the children attended a rural school. A four room consolidated school had been built at Blabon in 1914. Henry and Minnie continued their education - completing the two-year high school offered. In 1912 Olga entered Hope High School and graduated in 1915. She then attended Mayville Normal School for one year and received an elementary teaching certificate. She then taught lower grades at Blabon Consolidated School for three years. Olga then returned to school at the University of North Dakota and received a higher teaching certificate. Her teaching career was spent teaching at Crookston, Marshall, and Minneapolis, Minnesota.

While Olga Langager attended high school at Hope, she joined a Campfire Girls Organization that had been organized in 1910 by Mrs. Homer Moore, wife of the Methodist minister. This was the first Campfire group in the area. Some of the original members were: Urah and Hazel Klutter, Hattie Elliot, Olga Langager, Frances and Elsie Lockwood, Grace Lunding, Anna Swanson, Dori Tillotson, and Gussie Patton.

The Campfire Girls camped in summer at Fluto Bridge Park on the Sheyenne River in Griggs County. The Mayor and Recreational Director from Cooperstown invited the group to come to Cooperstown to demonstrate their ceremonials. The girls, in pairs, hiked the five miles into town. Here they were served a supper. After dark they made the demonstration. They were then returned to camp by car.

During the children's growing up years on the White farm, the girls learned to play the piano

the boys learned to play instruments and faithfully attended band practice every week under Mr. Bilden's instruction. One could see them, with instrument cases in hand, dashing across the pasture and catching the freight to band practice in Blabon. After practice they walked the two miles home. The Blabon Band was popular

it played in parades at Hope, fairs in Griggs County-Cooperstown, and Steele County fairs at Finley.

The Langager home was always a great gathering place for young people of the community. They might play tennis or ball

most frequently, they'd be found gathered around the piano singing songs by the hour. Mrs. Langager was never so busy that she couldn't very quickly prepare food for the family's parties.

The families felt the need for Christian nurture to which they had been accustomed. There was no church near so 12 families decided to build a church. It was Blabon Lutheran Church. Mr. Langager was a charter member and Mrs. Langager was the first Ladies Aid president. Ladies Aid and Farmers Club were held often in the Langager home.

Tolles Langager, a farmer, married Ella Locken of Hope.

World War I broke out and Miller Langager and friend Ross Durenburger, the school principal, enlisted and served in the army. Victory gardens were planted by children, sweaters, scarves and wash cloths were knit by the women for the servicemen.

In the fall of 1921 the Langagers left the Blabon community and moved to a farm five miles east of Clifford, North Dakota, where they farmed one section of land. They joined the Lutheran Church in Clifford, and were very active in church and community affairs.

It was here their three daughters were married - they had lovely home weddings at that time. The two sons at home, were also married.

Elmer married Solvieg Dahl on October 14, 1933.

Henry married Anna Gilbertson, of Pickert, on December 5, 1925. They had a family of three boys and one girl, Henry, Vernon, Glen and Ann Christine.

Olga married Elvin Olson on December 5, 1925, and had a family of three girls and two boys, Ruth, Esther, Elizabeth, Donovan, and Donald.

Donald died at the age of seven months.

Minnie married Norod Olson on March 20, 1926. Their family was two girls and one boy, Valborg, Mary and Howard. Howard died at the age of 13 in 1944.

In the summer of 1932 Mrs. Langager's health began to fail and on September 20, 1932, she passed away at her farm home.

From this time on Mr. Langager's health also failed, he turned all his farming over to his son, Elmer, and on June 5, 1933, he died - just nine months after his wife. His sons are now all gone and also his daughter, Clara. Minnie and Olga still reside in the Clifford area.

Source: Hope Through the Century - Hope, North Dakota 1882-1982 Page 497

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Astrid Haugland

Takk for interessant informasjon og gode spor å følja vidare :)!

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Astrid Haugland

Christine M. Langager

  •  

Birth: Mar. 6, 1864Death: Sep. 20, 1932

Traill County

North Dakota, USAtrans.gif

 Burial:

Clifford Cemetery 

Clifford

Traill County

North Dakota, USA 

Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?

Created by: lk51t

Record added: Jun 10, 2009 

Find A Grave Memorial# 38153460

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=langager&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSob=n&GRid=38153460&df=all&

Prøver å nøste via søsteren til Johanna.

 

 

Christine Langager
United States Census, 1930
Name Christine Langager Event Type Census Event Date 1930 Event Place Mayville, Traill, North Dakota, United States Gender Female Age 66 Marital Status Married Race White Race (Original) White Relationship to Head of Household Wife Relationship to Head of Household (Original) Wife Birth Year (Estimated) 1864 Birthplace Norway Immigration Year 1885 Father's Birthplace Norway Mother's Birthplace Norway Sheet Letter A Sheet Number 4
HOUSEHOLD ROLE GENDER AGE BIRTHPLACE

 

Maudine Langager

Head M 67 Norway

 

Christine Langager

Wife F 66 Norway

 

Elmer M Langager

Son M 35 North Dakota

https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XKVV-95S

 

----

 

Mandius T. Langager

 

Birth:  Mar. 13, 1863 Death:  Jun. 5, 1933

Traill County

North Dakota, USA trans.gif   Burial:

Clifford Cemetery 

Clifford

Traill County

North Dakota, USA  

Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]  

Created by: lk51t

Record added: Jun 10, 2009 

Find A Grave Memorial# 38153475

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=langager&GSiman=1&GScid=101815&GRid=38153475&

Mr. Mandius T. Langager was born at Karmoy, Skudeness, Stovanger, Norway in 1863. His parents were Torbjorn and Ellen Kjerstine Langager. He completed his education at about age 19. He then was an apprenticed seaman of a commercial fishing fleet.

In 1885 Mandius (M.T.) immigrated to America where there was more opportunity for advancement. He went directly to Clifford, where many of his friends had settled. He worked for a farmer, Mr. Mons Knutson.

Here he met Kristine Moe, who had come to America with her brother from Gulbrandsdalen, Norway. She was born in 1864 and came here in 1885. A sister and the parents came later. Mandius and Kristine were married in March 1887.

After their marriage, they moved to the Portland area and rented a quarter of land. By 1885 all available land in the area had been settled. They had seven children

1.     Tolles,

2.     Clara,

3.     Miller,

4.     Elmer,

5.     Olga,

6.     Minnie, and

7.     Henry.

While they resided here the two older children, Tolles and Clara, attended Bruflat Academy at Portland, a church school, where the children could stay at a dormitory. County rural schools were then built and the children transferred to country schools.

Needing more land to farm, Mr. Langager and his wife moved to the Blabon-Hope area in the spring of 1900. They lived on the northeast corner of section 12 adjoining the southwest corner of Blabon. The house to which the family moved was typical of the homes at that time

it consisted of one large room plus a leanto kitchen and entry.

While they lived there the mail came as far as Hope. Langager was appointed postmaster and the post office was in his home. The mail was carried from Hope by his son, Tolles, by bicycle in summer and horse and sled in winter. The neighbors came to pick up their mail.

At this time the cattle grazed the fields - many coyotes were still in the area. One day a pack of coyotes chased the cattle and Mr. Langager heard the noise and knew what was happening. He snatched his gun and ran outside. To avoid being trampled, he leaped to the top of a water tank and shot one shot into the air. At once the coyotes left.

The Langagers then moved to a farm in Hugo Township. The farm was later owned by the Ben Nelson family. The children attended Hugo School #1.

During this time rural mail delivery service and telephone service came to the community. Mr. and Mrs. John Lind carried the mail for many, many years. They traveled the route with horses and later used automobiles, often the car would break down midroute and the Linds would finish the route on foot.

The family settled again on the J. A. White farm between Blabon and Hope. This is the farm now occupied by the Edward Edwardson family. To begin with, the children attended a rural school. A four room consolidated school had been built at Blabon in 1914. Henry and Minnie continued their education - completing the two-year high school offered. In 1912 Olga entered Hope High School and graduated in 1915. She then attended Mayville Normal School for one year and received an elementary teaching certificate. She then taught lower grades at Blabon Consolidated School for three years. Olga then returned to school at the University of North Dakota and received a higher teaching certificate. Her teaching career was spent teaching at Crookston, Marshall, and Minneapolis, Minnesota.

While Olga Langager attended high school at Hope, she joined a Campfire Girls Organization that had been organized in 1910 by Mrs. Homer Moore, wife of the Methodist minister. This was the first Campfire group in the area. Some of the original members were: Urah and Hazel Klutter, Hattie Elliot, Olga Langager, Frances and Elsie Lockwood, Grace Lunding, Anna Swanson, Dori Tillotson, and Gussie Patton.

The Campfire Girls camped in summer at Fluto Bridge Park on the Sheyenne River in Griggs County. The Mayor and Recreational Director from Cooperstown invited the group to come to Cooperstown to demonstrate their ceremonials. The girls, in pairs, hiked the five miles into town. Here they were served a supper. After dark they made the demonstration. They were then returned to camp by car.

During the children's growing up years on the White farm, the girls learned to play the piano

the boys learned to play instruments and faithfully attended band practice every week under Mr. Bilden's instruction. One could see them, with instrument cases in hand, dashing across the pasture and catching the freight to band practice in Blabon. After practice they walked the two miles home. The Blabon Band was popular

it played in parades at Hope, fairs in Griggs County-Cooperstown, and Steele County fairs at Finley.

The Langager home was always a great gathering place for young people of the community. They might play tennis or ball

most frequently, they'd be found gathered around the piano singing songs by the hour. Mrs. Langager was never so busy that she couldn't very quickly prepare food for the family's parties.

The families felt the need for Christian nurture to which they had been accustomed. There was no church near so 12 families decided to build a church. It was Blabon Lutheran Church. Mr. Langager was a charter member and Mrs. Langager was the first Ladies Aid president. Ladies Aid and Farmers Club were held often in the Langager home.

Tolles Langager, a farmer, married Ella Locken of Hope.

World War I broke out and Miller Langager and friend Ross Durenburger, the school principal, enlisted and served in the army. Victory gardens were planted by children, sweaters, scarves and wash cloths were knit by the women for the servicemen.

In the fall of 1921 the Langagers left the Blabon community and moved to a farm five miles east of Clifford, North Dakota, where they farmed one section of land. They joined the Lutheran Church in Clifford, and were very active in church and community affairs.

It was here their three daughters were married - they had lovely home weddings at that time. The two sons at home, were also married.

Elmer married Solvieg Dahl on October 14, 1933.

Henry married Anna Gilbertson, of Pickert, on December 5, 1925. They had a family of three boys and one girl, Henry, Vernon, Glen and Ann Christine.

Olga married Elvin Olson on December 5, 1925, and had a family of three girls and two boys, Ruth, Esther, Elizabeth, Donovan, and Donald.

Donald died at the age of seven months.

Minnie married Norod Olson on March 20, 1926. Their family was two girls and one boy, Valborg, Mary and Howard. Howard died at the age of 13 in 1944.

In the summer of 1932 Mrs. Langager's health began to fail and on September 20, 1932, she passed away at her farm home.

From this time on Mr. Langager's health also failed, he turned all his farming over to his son, Elmer, and on June 5, 1933, he died - just nine months after his wife. His sons are now all gone and also his daughter, Clara. Minnie and Olga still reside in the Clifford area.

Source: Hope Through the Century - Hope, North Dakota 1882-1982 Page 497

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Dette var fantastiskt. Og det går dessuten å følja denne aktive familien i avisa "The Hope pioneer".

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/search/pages/results/?state=&date1=1836&date2=1922&proxtext=Langager&x=0&y=0&dateFilterType=yearRange&rows=20&searchType=basic

 

Mvh Astrid

 

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