Jump to content
Arkivverket
Carl-Henry Geschwind

Origins of the family Munthe

Recommended Posts

Carl-Henry Geschwind
Posted (edited)

The Munthe family is a prominent family in both Norway and Sweden (see https://lokalhistoriewiki.no/wiki/Munthe and https://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Munthe). In a comprehensive genealogy published in 1883, Hartvig Munthe was able to trace this family back to a Ludvig Munthe who lived in Lübeck, Germany around 1560. He then asserted that this family could be traced back to a noble Flemish family van Munte. He could not make a direct link betweeen Ludvig Munthe and this van Munte family, but he argued for the connection based on: (1) no other noble Munte/Munthe family was known; (2) the van Munte family disappeared from Flemish records in the mid-16th century, just around the time that Ludvig Munthe appeared in Lübeck.

 

In 2012 Gunnar Munthe, of the Swedish Munthesläktföreningen, had Belgian genealogist Jan Caluwaerts look into the connection between Ludvig Munthe and the van Munte family. Caluwaerts argued against any connection, primarily on the basis that the coat of arms shown on the 1649 epitaph of Bergen bishop Ludvig Munthe, the grandson of Ludvig Munthe of Lübeck (a Saint Andrew's cross in the upper half and three balls in the lower half) was completely unlike the coat of arms of the Flemish van Munte family (a six-pointed star in the upper left and a lion in both the upper right and lower half). Instead, the coat of arms of Ludvig Munthe was identical to that given to a Cornelis Münth, who came from Aachen in Germany. Caluwaerts then was able to trace the ancestry of Ludvig Munthe via a father in Antwerpen, Belgium, to a grandfather and a great-grandfather in Aachen.

 

While Caluwaerts' 2012 report was very interesting, it lacked proper documentation in certain respects, especially with regard to German sources. I have thus followed up on his research (helped by the fact that I am a native speaker of German). I hired Jan Caluwaerts to provide additional documentation from Belgian archives. I also obtained additional documents from the city archives of Lübeck (with the help of archivist Meike Kruse and of Norwegian genealogist Hanne Heen), and I hired a German genealogist (Birgit Tenter) to provide source material from Aachen. With this material I was able to confirm Caluwaerts' basic finding (that Ludvig Munthe of Lübeck's great-grandfather came from Aachen, where he was documented 1437-1460) while correcting some details and adding information on cognate ancestors (for example, I have found an exact death date for Ludvig Munthe's father-in-law Johannes Paludan and birth and death dates for his mother-in-law Barbara van den Roest).

 

In the following entries, I will provide my fully referenced results on the ancestry of Johan Munthe of Tikøb (the son of Ludvig Munthe of Lübeck and the ancestor of both the Norwegian and the Swedish branches of the Munthe family).

Edited by Carl-Henry Geschwind

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Carl-Henry Geschwind

Parents' Generation

 

(2), (3): Merchant and wife in Lübeck, Germany - parents of (1) Johan Munthe

            Johan Munthe's father is called (2) Lodewijck Munten in Belgian sources and (2) Ladewig/Ladewich Munten in north German sources; both first names are equivalent to the Scandinavian Ludvig. He was the son of (5) Agatha Mertens and her first husband (4) Lodewijck Munten (died 1540/41), as shown by the fact that in 1555 and 1556 Ladewig Munten appeared before the Lübeck city council as agent for Martin van den Bruele of Antwerpen, whom he called his step-father; this Martin van den Bruele is known to have been the second husband of Agatha Mertens.[1] Lodewijck Munten deposed on 8 May 1560 in Antwerpen that he was a burgher of Lübeck and 30 years old; he thus was born around 1530.[2]  His parents are documented in Mechelen (halfway between Antwerpen and Brussels in Belgium) in 1524 and in Frankfurt in 1531; it is thus unclear where he was born. According to a family genealogy written no later than the 1640s and known from two 18th-century copies, Ladewig was married to (3) Elisabeth Paludan, daughter of (6) Johannes Paludan and his wife (7) Barbara.[3] In his 1560 deposition, Lodewijck stated that he had seen Jan van den Broecke (original Flemish version of Johannes Paludan's name) and his wife Barbara van den Roest in Lübeck 1 April 1560. In 1561 Ladewig Munte bought a house in Lübeck, which he sold again in 1564.[4] In 1563 Ladewich Munte bought another house in the Bredenstrate in Lübeck.[5] On 2 August 1567 Erasmus Paludanus (Elisabeth's brother, according to the family genealogy) and Gillies Muus were appointed as guardians of the children of the late Ladewig Munten, indicating that Ladewig had died.[6] Apparently Elisabeth had died by 8 August 1567 as well.[7] Shortly thereafter (still in 1567) the guardians of the late Ladewich Munten's children sold the house in the Bredenstrate.[8]


[1] On 17 May 1555 Ladewich Munten appeared on behalf of his "father" Martin van den Bruele of Antwerpen: Archiv der Hansestadt Lübeck, Niederstadtbuch 1555, fol. 96r. On 20 March 1556 Ladewig Munten appeared on behalf of his stepfather Marten van dem Bruel: Archiv der Hansestadt Lübeck, Niederstadtbuch 1556, fol. 73r. For Martin van den Bruele as Agatha Mertens's second husband, see discussion below under (5) Agatha Mertens

[2] Stadsarchief Antwerpen, Certificatieboek nr. 16 (1560), fol. 112v

[3] Hartvig Munthe, Efterretninger om Familien Munthe i ældre og i nyere Tid (Christiania: 1883-1888), pp. 47-55

[4] Archiv der Hansestadt Lübeck, Straßenregister Oberstadtbücher - Jacobi-Quartier, p. 524

[5] Archiv der Hansestadt Lübeck, Straßenregister Oberstadtbücher - Jacobi-Quartier, p. 651

[6] Archiv der Hansestadt Lübeck, Niederstadtbuch 1567, fol. 152v. The childrens' names were given as Ladewig, Johan, and Elisabeth.

[7] The card index for the Archiv der Hansestadt Lübeck shows an entry for the appointment of guardians for the late Elisabeth Munten's children on 8 August 1567; however, a search by the archive staff failed to turn up the corresponding entry in the Niederstadtbuch 1567.

[8] Archiv der Hansestadt Lübeck, Straßenregister Oberstadtbücher - Jacobi-Quartier, p. 651

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Carl-Henry Geschwind

Grandparents' Generation

 

(4), (5): Merchant and wife in Antwerpen, Belgium - parents of (2) Ladewig Munten

            Ladewig Munten's father (4) Lodewijck Munten was the son of (8) Johannes Munten of Aachen, Germany, as documented when he was made a burgher of Mechelen (halfway between Antwerpen and Brussels in Belgium) in 1524 and a burgher of Antwerpen in 1537.[1] On 31 May 1524 he married (5) Agatha Mertens at Sint Janskerk (St. John's Church) in Mechelen.[2] She was the daughter of (10) Jan Mertens and his wife (11) Katlijne Schats, as shown by a 23 March 1531 document in which Agatha Martens, wife of Lodewijck Munten, settled the estate of Jan Martens with her siblings. This same document shows that by 1531 Lodewijck and Agatha were living in Frankfurt, Germany.[3] By December 1537 (when he was made a burgher there) they were living in Antwerpen.[4] On 12 Janury 1540 Lodewijck Munten was mentioned as Grand Almoner (official in charge of poor relief) of Antwerpen.[5] On 16 June 1540 Lodewijcke Munten and his wife Agatha bought a house in Antwerpen.[6] On 24 December 1541 Agatha Mertens, widow of Lodewijck Munten, and the guardians for the late Lodewijck's children sold this house; thus Lodewijck died sometime between June 1540 and December 1541.[7] Agatha remarried to Martin van den Bruele, as shown by the fact that on 11 June 1553 Agatha Mertens, wife of Marten vanden Bruele, was named in the settlement of the estate of her mother Katlijne Schatz, widow of Jan Martens.[8] Agatha was still alive on 22 June 1562 when Merten van den Bruele, merchant and burgher of Antwerpen, mentioned her in a document concerning her son Cornelis Munten.[9]

            The children of Lodewijck and Agatha are known from several documents concerning the estate of Lambert Munten, canon at the Aachen minster (and son of Johannes Munten's brother Adam Munten), who in 1558 bequeathed his share in the Haus Löwenstein (a patrician house on the market square in Aachen) and another house in the Wirichbongardstraße in Aachen as well as some money to the children of his nephew (should be cousin) Lodewijck Munten (as well as to Lodewijck's sister Catharina and the children of his sister Maria Pastoir).[10] In a document signed in Antwerpen 14 November 1559, Adam Munten received the power-of-attorney of his siblings Marie Munten (wife of Jan Morissen), Margriete Munten (wife of Anthonis Raes), Erasmus Munten (underage), Cornelis Munten (out-of-town), and Lodewick Munten (also out-of-town) to collect the inheritance due them from their relative Lambert Munten, canon of Aachen, as well as their maiden aunt Anna Munten of Aachen.[11] On 31 January 1572 in Aachen this same Adam Munten, with power-of-attorney from his siblings Anna Munten (wife of Leinen Dherden -she was not mentioned in 1559) and Merie Munten (wife in second marriage of Johan Tolette) and the children of his deceased brothers Cornellis and Ludwich Munten (note that Erasmus Munten is not mentioned; he may have died without descendants before 1572) sold their shares in the Haus Löwenstein to his sister Margriete Munten and her husband Anthoin Raeß (other sellers included Catherine Munten, widow of a von Leuvenich, and her sons Johan von Louvenich and Adam von Leuvenich as well as the siblings Johan, Gerhardt, Arnold, and Sibilla Pastor).[12]

 

(6), (7): Doctor and wife in Lübeck, Germany - parents of (3) Elisabeth Paludan

            Elisabeth Paludan's father (6) Johannes Paludanus (the original Flemish name was Jan van den Broecke) was (at least according to a family history written no later than the 1640s that is preserved in two copies from the 18th century) born in 1497.[13] He may very well have been the Ioannes Paludanus who enrolled at the medical college in Montpellier (southern France) in January 1528 (his son Johannes would also enroll there a generation later); the enrollment record showed this Johannes to be a native of Aalst (west of Brussels in Belgium).[14] According to the family history, he at first practiced as a doctor in Gent (west of Aalst), but finding his position there as a Lutheran to be untenable he eventually moved to Lübeck.[15] Johannes Pollitanus was recorded as a doctor of medicine in Lübeck in 1557.[16] In 1564 he was city physician in Lübeck when a pest epidemic broke out there; the following year, when the plague reached Hamburg, he was called to that city to assist in combatting the epidemic.[17] He died on 19 October 1565, soon after his return to Lübeck.[18] He was married to a (7) Barbara; her last name was given as van der Rone in the family history[19] and as van der Roest in an 8 May 1560 deposition in Antwerpen in which her son-in-law Lodewijck Munten testified that he had seen Jan van den Broecke, doctor of medicine, and his wife Barbara van den Roest in Lübeck on 1 April 1560.[20]  She survived her husband and moved with her children to Copenhagen, where her son Johannes was serving as personal physician to the queen mother and her daughter Barbara in 1568 married the court preacher of king Frederik II.[21] According to her epitaphium in a Copenhagen church, she died at age 68 after 34 years of "happy and fertile" marriage and 16 years of widowhood; this implies that she married Johannes about 1531 (34 years before his death in 1565), was born about 1513, and died about 1581.[22]


[1] On 6 June 1524 Lodewijck Munte, son of Joannes Munte, merchant of Aachen, was made a burgher of Mechelen: Marcel Kocken (ed.), De gekochte poorters van Mechelen (1400-1795) (Handzame: 1975), p. 285. On 10 December 1537 Louwijck Munten, son of Jan Munten, merchant of Aachen, was made a burgher of Antwerpen: Stadsarchief Antwerpen, Vierschaarboek nr. 142 (1531-1538), fol. 281v

[2] Marriage of Lodewijc Muynten and Agata terMertens: Mechelen Sint Janskerk, Parochieregisters nr. 1 (Huwelijken 1519-1610), p. 16

[3] Stadsarchief Antwerpen, Schepenregister nr. 179 (1531), fol. 529v-533v

[4] Stadsarchief Antwerpen, Vierschaarboek nr. 142 (1531-1538), fol. 281v

[5] Stadsarchief Antwerpen, Schepenregister nr. 198 (1539-1540), fol. 214v

[6] Stadsarchief Antwerpen, Schepenregister nr. 199 (1539-1540), fol. 119r-120v

[7] Stadsarchief Antwerpen, Schepenregister nr. 205 (1541), fol. 110r-111r

[8] Stadsarchief Antwerpen, Certificatieboek nr.  8 (1553), fol. 15r

[9] Stadsarchief Antwerpen, Certificatieboek nr. 18 (1562), fol. 78v

[10] J. L. Meulleners (ed.), "Testament van den kanonik Lambertus Munten te Aken (1558)," De Maasgouw, 9 (1887): 105-110, on p. 106

[11] Stadsarchief Antwerpen Antwerpen, Certificatieboek nr. 14 (1559), fols. 389v-390r

[12] Deed dated 31 Jan 1572, printed in Hermann Friedrich Macco, Geschichte und Genealogie der Familie Pastor (Aachen: 1905), pp. 212-213

[13] Hartvig Munthe, Efterretninger om Familien Munthe i ældre og i nyere Tid (Christiania: 1883-1888), p. 47

[14] Marcel Gouron (ed.), Matricule de l'Université de Médecine de Montpellier 1503-1599 (Genève: 1957), p. 53

[15] Hartvig Munthe, Efterretninger om Familien Munthe i ældre og i nyere Tid (Christiania: 1883-1888), p. 47

[16] Archiv der Hansestadt Lübeck, Niederstadtbuch 1557, fols. 174v-175r

[17] Johannis Bökelii, Pestordnung in der Stadt Hamburg (Hamburg: 1597), fol. 3a

[18] Two church officials depose on 5 May 1570 that Johan Paludanus, late doctor of medicine, died in Lübeck 19 October 1565 and was buried the following day at St. Catharinen churchyard: Archiv der Hansestadt Lübeck, Niederstadtbuch 1570, fols. 145v-146r

[19] Hartvig Munthe, Efterretninger om Familien Munthe i ældre og i nyere Tid (Christiania: 1883-1888), p. 47

[20] Stadsarchief Antwerpen, Certificatieboek nr. 16 (1560), fol. 112v

[21] Hartvig Munthe, Efterretninger om Familien Munthe i ældre og i nyere Tid (Christiania: 1883-1888), p. 47

[22] Petrus Resenius, Inscriptiones Haffnienses Latinæ Danicæ et Germanicæ (Haffniæ: 1668), p. 107

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Carl-Henry Geschwind

Great-Grandparents' Generation

 

(8), (9): City councillor and wife in Aachen, Germany - parents of (4) Lodewijck Munten

            Lodewijck Munten's father (8) Johannes Munten "de Aquisgrani" (of Aachen) enrolled at the University of Erfurt in spring 1471.[1] His brothers Adam and Ludwig Munten had already been students at Erfurt in 1468 and 1470, respectively.[2] Their father very likely was city councillor (16) Daem Munten of Aachen; the strongest evidence for this is that Daem around 1460 owned several houses on Wirichbongardstraße in Aachen while Adam's son Lambert Munten in 1558 owned a share in "the house in Wirichbongard, called old Adam Munten's house."[3] According to local genealogist Hermann Macco, in 1484 Johannes issued a receipt for an annuity payment to his wife from the city of Cologne.[4] In 1495 Johannes Munten, "consul regie vrbis Aquisgrani" (that is, city councillor of the imperial city of Aachen), together with his wife (9) Maria Bestoltz commissioned a Book of Hours from Theodericus Clocker of Aachen; the illuminated manuscript is now in the Bodleian Library at Oxford.[5] According to Aachen genealogist Hermann Macco, on 22 March 1498 Johannes bought a house at Kleiner Dobach in Aachen; this house was sold again 1526 by his daughter Anna.[6] Sometime between 1502 and 1509 Johannes Munten and his wife Maria Bestoltz along with her other siblings sold their inherited shares in the Haus Papagei to their brother Peter Bestoltz; this house had been bought 1462 by (18) Thys Bestoltz, who thus almost certainly was Maria's father.[7] On 20 March 1509 Hans and his brother Adam Münth were granted a non-noble coat-of-arms by the Holy Roman Emperor; the exact description of this coat-of-arms has not been preserved, but it is likely to be a version of the coat-of-arms later granted to Johannes's great-grandson Cornelius Münth in 1626 (that is, a Saint Andrew's Cross in the upper half and three balls or coins in the lower half).[8] On 30 April 1509, Johann Munthe and his wife Marye Bestoultz bought a life annuity from the city of Cologne.[9] The death register of benefactors of the Congregation of Windesheim in Aachen states that Johannes Munten, "consul urbis Aquensis" (city councillor of Aachen), died 1 May 1509.[10] The nunnery at Wenau, just outside Aachen (also recipient of a bequest), likewise held an annual mass on 1 May for the souls of Ioannis Munten and his wife Marie.[11]

 

(10), (11): Resident and wife of Mechelen, Belgium - parents of (5) Agatha Mertens

            Agatha Merten's father (10) Jan Mertens, son of Henricus Mertens, brewer of Retie (east of Antwerpen in Belgium), was made a burgher of Mechelen 19 October 1509.[12] He was dead by 23 March 1531, when his property was divided among his heirs.[13] He was survived by his wife (and mother of his children) (11) Katlijne Schats. She had died by 11 June 1553, when her property was divided among her heirs.[14] According to Belgian genealogist A. Goovaerts, she was the daughter of (22) Cornelis Schats and his wife (23) Marguerite Vrancx; I have not followed up to determine what primary sources this might be based on.[15]


[1] J. C. Hermann Weissenborn (ed.), Acten der Erfurter Universitaet (Halle: 1881), I: 343

[2] J. C. Hermann Weissenborn (ed.), Acten der Erfurter Universitaet (Halle: 1881), I: 329, 340

[3] Michael Schmitt, Die städtebauliche Entwicklung Aachens im Mittelalter unter Berücksichtigung der gestaltbildenden Faktoren (Ph.D. diss., Aachen, 1972), p. 225; J. L. Meulleners (ed.), "Testament van den kanonik Lambertus Munten te Aken (1558)," De Maasgouw, 9 (1887): 105-110, on p. 106

[4] Hermann Friedrich Macco, Geschichte und Genealogie der Familie Pastor (Aachen: 1905), p. 80

[5] Falconer Madan, A Summary Catalogue of Western Manuscripts in the Bodleian Library (Oxford: 1905), V: 720

[6] Hermann Friedrich Macco, Geschichte und Genealogie der Familie Pastor (Aachen: 1905), p. 80

[7] Luise Freiin von Coels von der Brügghen, "Das Haus zum Papagei," Zeitschrift des Aachener Geschichtsvereins, 57 (1936): 54-62, on pp. 56-57 (this secondary source, based on original records in the Aachen city archives, unfortunately does not give the date of the sale; a date from 1502 to 1509 has been estimated based upon the dates the various siblings and spouses who were parties to the transaction were alive)

[8] Österreichisches Staatsarchiv (Wien), Allgemeines Verwaltungsarchiv, Adelsarchiv, Reichsadelsakten 286.37 ("Münth, Cornel, Bestätigung und Besserung des seinen Voreltern dd. 20.03.1509 verliehenen Wappens")

[9] Unpublished deed dated 30 April 1509, Historisches Archiv der Stadt Köln, Haupturkundenarchiv U2/15492

[10] J. Greving, "Geschichte des Klosters der Windesheimer Chorherren zu Aachen," Zeitschrift des Aachener Geschichtsvereins, 13 (1891): 1-122, on p. 98

[11] E. von Oidtmann (ed.), "Memorienbuch des Klosters Wenau," Zeitschrift des Aachener Geschichtsvereins, 4 (1882): 251-317, on p. 275

[12] Marcel Kocken (ed.), De gekochte poorters van Mechelen (1400-1795) (Handzame: 1975), p. 261

[13] Stadsarchief Antwerpen, Schepenregister nr. 179 (1531), fol. 529v-533v

[14] Stadsarchief Antwerpen, Certificatieboek nr.  8 (1553), fol. 15r

[15] John V. L. Pruyn (based on research conducted by A. Goovaerts), "The Pruyn Family of the Netherlands," Maandblad, De Nederlandsche Leeuw 18 (1900): cols. 145-158, on col. 153

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Carl-Henry Geschwind

Great-Great-Grandparents' Generation

 

(16): City Councillor of Aachen, Germany - father of (8) Johannes Munten

            Johannes Munten's father (16) Daem Munten (Daem appears to be a local variant of Adam) was named in a 1437 list of city councillors of Aachen forced to make a loan to the city.[1] Daem Monten was listed in a property register from around 1460 as owning several houses "along the creek" on the Wirichbongardstraße in Aachen.[2] In 1558 Daem's grandson Lambert Munten still owned one quarter of "the house in Wirichbongard, called old Adam Munten's house."[3]

            Daem's origin is unknown. Aachen genealogist Hermann Macco speculated in 1905 that he was of an old patrician family from Cologne, apparently on the basis that an Odilie Munten is documented in Cologne in the 1460s.[4] However, it appears to me just as likely that the Muntens were an old Aachen family - in the 1300s, Johannes Munt, Heribertus de Monte, Arnoldus de Monte, Martin Munt, and Reinhard Munt (with son Lambret Munt) are all documented as judges in Aachen, although their relationship to each other is unclear.[5]

 

(18), (19): Resident and wife of Aachen, Germany - parents of (9) Maria Bestoltz

            Maria Bestoltz's father (18) Thys Bestoltz (the first name is a local short form of Matthias) first appeared in the record about 1460 when Thiis Bestoultz and his wife Liisbeth invested in an annuity with the city of Aachen.[6] On 23 April 1462 Thys Bestoltz bought the Haus zum Papagei (a patrician house in Aachen).[7] His father Peter Bestoltz (of whom I have not been able to find other information) provided financial assistance for this purchase and was finally repaid in 1469.[8] On 4 February 1472 Theis Bestoltz, by this time one of the two chief administrators of the clothmakers' guild in Aachen, and his wife Lysgen (another form of Elisabeth) bought a mill just outside the city of Aachen.[9] In 1473 he was appointed as one of the city's two "rent-masters" (in essence in charge of the city's treasury).[10] On 31 March 1473 This Bestolz and his wife (19) Lisbeth Wolff entered into an agreement with her brothers and brothers-in-law to divide up the property of their father (38) Clais Wolff, with This and Lisbeth receiving a house on the Pontstraße in Aachen.[11] In 1475 Mathys Bestoltz served a one-year term as one of Aachen's two mayors.[12] On 24 February 1476 Matthijs Bestoltz, mayor of Aachen, and his wife Lyessgen sold the house on the Pontstraße in exchange for an annuity.[13] The death register of benefactors of the Congregation of Windesheim in Aachen states that Mathias Bestoltz, city councillor and then mayor of Aachen, died 23 June 1483.[14] Lisbeth was still living on 27 August 1488 when her son Peter Bestoltz on her behalf bought a property adjoining the Haus zum Papagei.[15]

 

(22), (23): Resident and wife of Mechelen, Belgium - parents of (11) Katlijne Schats

            Katlijne Schats's father (22) Cornelis Schats, son of Joannes Schats, merchant of Bergen (i.e. Mons, capital of the Belgian province Hainaut), was made a burgher of Mechelen 27 January 1476.[16] According to a French-language guide to Belgian tombstones published in 1845, Corneille Schatz, who died in 1535, and his wife (23) Marguerite Vrancx were buried at Sint Janskerk (St. John's Church) in Mechelen, with their coats-of-arms on their tombstone.[17] According to a French-language genealogy first published in 1777, Marguerite Vrancx, wife of Corneille Schatz, was the daughter of (46) Josse Vrancx and his first wife (47) Isabelle de Bevere. [18] A Flemish-language account of religious strife in Brabant published in 1762 also stated (using the Flemish equivalents of French names) that Cornelis Schats's wife Margareta Vrancx was the daughter of Joos Vrancx and Elisabeth van Beveren.[19] I have not followed up to determine what primary sources might support this genealogy.


[1] Thomas R. Kraus (ed.), Die Aachener Stadtrechnungen des 15. Jahrhunderts (Düsseldorf: 2004), p. 96

[2] Michael Schmitt, Die städtebauliche Entwicklung Aachens im Mittelalter unter Berücksichtigung der gestaltbildenden Faktoren (Ph.D. diss., Aachen, 1972), p. 225

[3] J. L. Meulleners (ed.), "Testament van den kanonik Lambertus Munten te Aken (1558)," De Maasgouw, 9 (1887): 105-110, on p. 106

[4] Hermann Friedrich Macco, Geschichte und Genealogie der Familie Pastor (Aachen: 1905), p. 80

[5] Luise Freiin von Coels von der Brügghen, "Die Schöffen des Königlichen Stuhls von Aachen von der frühesten Zeit bis zur endgültigen Aufhebung der reichsstädtischen Verfassung 1798," Zeitschrift des Aachener Geschichtsvereins, 50 (1928): 1-596, on pp. 60, 74, 100, 118-119

[6] Thomas R. Kraus (ed.), Die Aachener Stadtrechnungen des 15. Jahrhunderts (Düsseldorf: 2004), p. 386

[7] Stadtarchiv Aachen, Schöffenbriefe 1462 April 23 nr. 4

[8] Stadtarchiv Aachen, Schöffenbriefe 1469 April 19

[9] Hermann Friedrich Macco, Aachener Wappen und Genealogien (Aachen: 1907-1908), I: 34

[10] Thomas R. Kraus (ed.), Die Aachener Stadtrechnungen des 15. Jahrhunderts (Düsseldorf: 2004), p. 464

[11] Hermann Friedrich Macco, Aachener Wappen und Genealogien (Aachen: 1907-1908), II: 242

[12] Luise Freiin von Coels von der Brügghen, "Die Aachener Bürgermeister von 1251 bis 1798," Zeitschrift des Aachener Geschichtsvereins, 55 (1933/34): 41-77, on pp. 55-56

[13] Deed dated 24 Feb 1476, printed in G. D. Franquinet, Beredeneerde Inventaris der Oorkonden en Bescheiden van de Abdij Kloosterrade (Maastricht: 1869), nr. 54

[14] J. Greving, "Geschichte des Klosters der Windesheimer Chorherren zu Aachen," Zeitschrift des Aachener Geschichtsvereins, 13 (1891): 1-122, on p. 99

[15] Luise Freiin von Coels von der Brügghen, "Das Haus zum Papagei," Zeitschrift des Aachener Geschichtsvereins, 57 (1936): 54-62, on pp. 56-57

[16] Marcel Kocken (ed.), De gekochte poorters van Mechelen (1400-1795) (Handzame: 1975), p. 184

[17] Léon de Herckenrode, Collection de Tombes, Épitaphes et Blasons, Recueilles dans les Églises et Couvents de la Hesbaye (Gand: 1845), p. 433

[18] Dumont, Fragmens généalogiques (Geneve: 1776-1777), IV: 51

[19] Die Waerachtige Gheschiedenisse, welcke Damiano à Goës toegecomen is . . . (Loven: 1760), unpaginated

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Carl-Henry Geschwind

Great-Great-Great-Grandparents' Generation

 

(38), (39): Property owner and wife in Aachen, Germany - parents of (19) Lisbeth Wolff

            Lisbeth Wolff's father (38) Clais Wolff in a property register prepared around 1460 was listed as owning two houses in Aachen.[1] The death register of benefactors of the Congregation of Windesheim in Aachen states that Nicholai Woyven died 1465; the annual mass for his soul was said on 19 April, which thus was probably the date of his death. The same register named his wife as (39) Lutgardis; nothing else is known of her.[2]

 

(46), (47): City councillor & wife in Mechelen, Belgium - parents of (23) Marguerite Vrancx

            According to Belgian genealogist Dumont (writing in the 1770s), Marguerite Vrancx's father (46) Josse Vrancx was the youngest son of Mechelen mayor (92) Gilles Vrancx and his wife (93) Isabelle vander Brugghe, was made a city councillor of Mechelen in 1478, and was married first to (47) Isabelle de Bevere, who died in 1468, and then to Isabelle vander Heyden. I have not followed up to determine what primary sources this might be based on.[3] Various internet genealogies assert that Isabelle de Bevere (or Elisabeth van Beveren, in the Flemish version of her name) was the daughter of Rotger van Beveren and his wife Stintje Beckering, but I have found no support for this.[4]


[1] Michael Schmitt, Die städtebauliche Entwicklung Aachens im Mittelalter unter Berücksichtigung der gestaltbildenden Faktoren (Ph.D. diss., Aachen, 1972), pp. 283, 299

[2] J. Greving, "Geschichte des Klosters der Windesheimer Chorherren zu Aachen," Zeitschrift des Aachener Geschichtsvereins, 13 (1891): 1-122, on p. 77

[3] Dumont, Fragmens généalogiques (Geneve: 1776-1777), IV: 49, 51

[4] In fact, the only reference I have found to a Rotger van Beveren and his wife Stine Beckening is a deed showing they were from Rheine in Germany (about 250 km from Mechelen) and had a daughter who was still alive in 1574, which is incompatible with them having been parents of a daughter who died as an adult in 1468: Vereinigte Westfälische Adelsarchive, Archiv Tatenhausen, Urkunde 526

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Carl-Henry Geschwind

Great-Great-Great-Great-Grandparents' Generation

 

(92), (93): Mayor and wife in Mechelen, Belgium - parents of (46) Josse Vrancx

            According to Belgian genealogist Dumont (writing in the 1770s), Josse Vrancx's father (92) Gilles Vrancx was mayor of Mechelen (no year given) and was married to (93) Isabelle vander Brugghe, who was his widow in 1468.[1]


[1] Dumont, Fragmens généalogiques (Geneve: 1776-1777), IV: 49

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Otto Martin Christensen
Posted (edited)

Thank you very much for sharing your research findings, Carl-Henry. Johannes (Hans) Munthe and his wife have left behind a very high number of descendants in both Norway and Sweden (plus the US/Canada). Furthermore, quite a few of these descendants have been giving  important contributions to the arts and sciences throughout the history, as well as having been active within politics, the church and many other areas (as all genealogists know) —so this is a topic of great historical and genealogical interest. Your (and your partners') work shows that it might be worthwhile to reconsider the outcomes of some of the "classical" genealogical  studies.Thanks a lot!

 

 

Edited by Otto Martin Christensen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Carl-Henry Geschwind
On 7/21/2019 at 9:44 AM, Carl-Henry Geschwind said:

Apparently Elisabeth had died by 8 August 1567 as well.[7]

 

The date both here and in the footnote should be 6 August 1567, not 8 August 1567.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Christoffer Owe

Thank you very much for your article. It is an impressive piece of work, covering several cities and countries. I wonder what similar treasures are hidden out there for other families.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kjell Arne Brudvik

Thank you Carl-Henry Geschwind for this impressive work. It's an outstanding example on research and dedication!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.