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Gjest Bruce Wiland

[#2086] Gardsnavn (ikke separeret)

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Gjest Bruce Wiland

In the 1865 census, the Gardsnavn sometimes shows "ikke separeret" in parenthesis after the farm name. Can you tell me the significance of this phrase?Also, is there any search function in this forum? I wanted to search for "ikke separeret" to see if the question had been previously asked and answered before I posted a new message.

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Gjest Knut Bryn

Perhaps you tell us which "Gardsnavn" this is, Bruce. This gives us a more firm ground when explaining the significance of this.A general search function for this forum is not available, but you can hit the

  1. -link at the bottom of the list. Then you will have a list of all subject titles.

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Gjest Bruce Wiland

There are numerous farms containing the "ikke separetet" phrase, but here are four examples as you have requested (from the 1865 census in Hedmark Romedal):Bjerkholsengen (ikke separetet) Granlien (ikke separetet) Mostuen (ikke separetet) Nordli (ikke separetet)

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Gjest Jan Oldervoll

I Norway one farm may consist of several holdings, each with a farmer both as an owner and user. Those holdings could in those days have their land (or plots) mixed or each could have a seperate piece of land, and could then even have their own name. But officially these holdings still was part of the same farm.I should think that ikke separeret means that the family in question lived on a holding with a name of their own but being part of a farm consisting of several holdings. They are not a separate farm.Any better ideas?

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Gjest Kristian Fjeldsgård

Jan is on the trail, but it goes some further.During centuries a farm was splitted between the children, it was not divided in two or more parts, but it was divided of value. One child could get two fields and three parts of the wood, and so on. During the 1800 it was an exchange of fields and parts, collected into geografical units with borders, the Norwegian expression was "Utskifting". I would mean that "Ikke separert" means that the farm hadn't gone through that process. ANother element with that was that on many farms the houses was collected on one place. The process forced also forced moving the houses. That means that people was so willing to go through the process

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Gjest Kristian Fjeldsgård

I forgot one aspect: The legal, I think people had to di it.

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Gjest Jan Oldervoll

Kristian is of course quite right.

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Gjest Kristian Fjeldsgård

Well I'm not quite satisfied - the spelling and editing was awfull, due to the time of day (nigt)

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