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The Modernization of Norwegian Naming Traditions


Richard Olsen

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16 timer siden, Richard Olsen skrev:

 

 

To simply show that I understand the temporarily nature of the use of farm names in the 19th Century, take note to the 2 above quotes. Notice my use of the word of when referring the Loevbakken Farm. OF, meaning from, and not necessarily current.

 

Nevertheless, the identifying markers remain.

 

In the 19th Century, Lars Haakon Pettersen Loevbakken could have relocated to a few different farms, but it still identifies as Lars Haakon, son of Peter, from the Loevbakken Farm.

Well you are correct that our surnames is still identifying markers as one living today called «Lars Haakon Pettersen Løvbakken» has two identifying names, Pettersen is most probably mothers surname which means his mom descends from a Petter, while Løvbakken is most probably his fathers surname meaning that his father descends from someone who has lived on a farm named Løvbakken. Its always interesting to understand how our traditions are interpreted by others, as we dont always recognize them ourselves 🙂 Theres always exceptions from any rule. My 5th great grandfather Aslach was born out of wedlock in 1737 and as he didnt have any rights to inherit his fathers farm he moved to Christiania where he was registered as a merchant in 1765, by then he was called «Aslach Christiansen» but all his children used the surname Grimsgaard after the farm theyr father was from, he has many descendants today with this surname, but when his great grandson was born he was named after his mothers father and thus my branch of the family uses Widerberg. In some earlier generations there was a tradition that you where also given the surname of the one you where named after (mostly common among the educated and bouergoise and doesnt have to be related), the surname was often added as a middle name or in my case replace (Also common further north among commoners). One other reason that farm names became popular even among the privileded and those living in cities was because of the «National romantic» era where the ideal was the norwegian farmer.

Edited by David Widerberg Howden
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2 hours ago, David Widerberg Howden said:

Its always interesting to understand how our traditions are interpreted by others, as we dont always recognize them ourselves

 

That honesty is refreshing.

 

It appears that many on this forum take offence to some of my comments. They are too quick to judgement. Instead, they should take the opportunity to learn.

 

I have a great interest in anything and everything pertaining to genealogy and history, mine and others. I genuinely absorb your comments on your family and others. I take everything as a learning opportunity. I sincerely thank you, and Inger, for taking the time to comment here. Your time and effort is not wasted.

 

Now, a little teaching moment for all readers...

You will notice my use of the word offence. No it is not misspelled. It is the British spelling, as oppose to the American spelling - offense. Canadians were/are influenced to use British spellings due to the historical connections with Britian. Since their independence Americans have created their own spellings of words.

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I can't resist pointing out that there were no strict rules in the prevoius centuries, either. Back then 90 % of the population were living at or of farms and the majority of them followed "the old pattern". 

 

Today only 10 % are living that way - and following the traditons are much less common.

 

But please remember that even way back there were lot of exceptions - nobility surnames often came from a crest (Hvitfeldt, Rosenvinge, Løvenskiold etc), from the priests congregation, from their occupations (Smith, Møller...) etc.

 

And things were much more local. Today "everybody" has contact with everybody on the net. And the population has grown, too. It's no longer easy to tell all the Ole Olsens or all the Hans Hansens from each other. There's much more practical to have a unique (or at least a less common) surname...

 

The population in Iceland is much smaller than in Norway - still "everybody" knows who Vigdis Finbogadottir is - she (and most Icelanders) doesn't need a surname to be recognized...

 

 

 

 

Edited by tom askerøi
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Tom

Thank you for your comments. It is greatly appreciated.

 

16 hours ago, tom askerøi said:

I can't resist pointing out that there were no strict rules in the prevoius centuries, either. Back then 90 % of the population were living at or of farms and the majority of them followed "the old pattern". 

 

Today only 10 % are living that way - and following the traditons are much less common.

 

You may have seen statistics, or the 10% is a good guess. That answers my original question - how much of today's use of names are modern and how much are tradition. Although, modern does resemble tradition, as David, Inger, and I have discussed. To foreigners, modern names (not all) appear to be traditional names in Norway.

 

16 hours ago, tom askerøi said:

But please remember that even way back there were lot of exceptions - nobility surnames often came from a crest (Hvitfeldt, Rosenvinge, Løvenskiold etc), from the priests congregation, from their occupations (Smith, Møller...) etc.

 

I did not mention the generalization of my questions due to the presumption that would be observed. In all countries, with all communications (or most) generalization is the norm. Although I am aware, I did not believe that I needed to point out that my questions were generalized. A lesson learned.

 

16 hours ago, tom askerøi said:

And things were much more local. Today "everybody" has contact with everybody on the net. And the population has grown, too. It's no longer easy to tell all the Ole Olsens or all the Hans Hansens from each other. There's much more practical to have a unique (or at least a less common) surname...

 

Agreed. I believed that was the reason why many people in Norway provide their full names. Perhaps my belief is wrong. In communities in Canada where there are 2 or more with the same name, they use their full name, the initial of middle name, or they are given nicknames.

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Extremely childish subject, including responses from, wagging, eager, naïve Norwegians, exept a few who have their professional point of view. Sad to see that a Canadian quarulant dominates the forum

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1 hour ago, Ivar Moe said:

Extremely childish subject, including responses from, wagging, eager, naïve Norwegians, exept a few who have their professional point of view. Sad to see that a Canadian quarulant dominates the forum

 

Ivar Moe

 

What is sad is that you can not recognize a mature topic. All you do is insult the people you are prejudice against, which appears to be all foreigners.

 

You make noise about others not using their full names. I challenge you to use your full name on this forum.

 

I will try to explain the topic to you in simple words

 

Due to Norway's historical naming practices in relation to patronymic names and  farm names, generally speaking, today Norwegians are limited to the historical naming patterns. Apart from Norwegians designing their own names, they (generally speaking) must use former patronymic names and/or former farm names.

 

The significance of this topic is the historical appearance to many names in Norway today, yet, there is no intention on the part of most people in Norway to be historical in their choice of names. If I was explaining this to an intelligent person, I would say something like - there is no mental state in which a person commits to such course of action.

 

Ivar, you can compete against me all you want, but you will never control me.

 

Advisory: I have studied human behaviour for decades. Ivar, if you insult me once more I will reveal your mental state here on this forum. Engage in discussions in a mature manner. I am sure that Norway has many mental health services available.

 

 

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8 replies in a row to your own post is a new record. I understand that you have a desire to improve your own ego. This is not the way to repair the big problem. This and other posts just show that you are on the wrong forum. There is little we can do to help you here, you obviously already know everything. Perhaps you should ask your questions to other agencies .

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Thanks for that. It's probably well-intentioned. But catastrophically wrong. Read what I write and try to answer it. Don't fall into the big rat trap of using inappropriate things against me or others. It always turns out very badly

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I consider myself to be a thought-provoker. Hopefully, that was accomplished on this thread.

 

I enjoy studying behaviours, which result in the formation of unique patterns.

 

Today's behaviours in Norway (pertaining to naming practices) are forming unique patterns. Perhaps a few people who read through this thread will be influenced to continue searching for the ability to view these patterns.

 

 

 

 

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