Gå til innhold
Arkivverket
Gjest Pearl Danroth

[#1604] Profession - Glasmester

Recommended Posts

Gjest Pearl Danroth

Is glasmester and glarmester the same profession? My grandfather, Martinius Johansen (born 1848) who was a glasmester, is listed in the Emigrants of Oslo (1900) and the Census of Norway for 1875. In the 1865 Census, I find a Martinius Johannes as an apprentice (lærendreng)living with a Glarmester. If glarmester and glasmester are the same profession, then I believe Martinius Johaness would be my grandfater. I can not find glarmester in the Norwegian-English dictionary and I am wondering if it is a typing error? Thank you.

Del dette innlegget


Lenke til innlegg
Del på andre sider
Gjest Hans Mathisen

I have never heard of "glarmester". I think it is a typing error or a wrong interpretation of someone's handwriting. Ten to one that is is "glasmester"! Good luck to you! Hans

Del dette innlegget


Lenke til innlegg
Del på andre sider
Gjest Jan Oldervoll

Hans is both right and wrong. It is not a typing error. There were lots of glarmesters in Norway. And they were all glasmesters. Glarmester is an old name for glasmester (glassmaster, one who put glass windows in houses).

Del dette innlegget


Lenke til innlegg
Del på andre sider
Gjest Egil Thee Danielsen

Glassmester heter på dansk glarmester. Det er r-formen som er den opprinnelige nordiske. Islandsk har glær, “gjennomsiktig”.

Del dette innlegget


Lenke til innlegg
Del på andre sider
Gjest Bjørn Skogli

Jaså, dette er forklaringen på (det nord-norske) uttrykket "glarholka"?Det er mye som faller på plass etterhvert...Hilsen Bjørn :-)

Del dette innlegget


Lenke til innlegg
Del på andre sider
Gjest Hans Mathisen

Takk for "glar-gjøringen"! Man blir visst aldri for gammel til å lære noe nytt! Vennlig hilsen Hans.

Del dette innlegget


Lenke til innlegg
Del på andre sider
Gjest Pearl Danroth

Hans - Could you give me a translation of what you fellows are discussing, I do not speak Norwegian, even though my father was born in Oslo? Does this help - Martinius Johansen was part-owner of a glass factory in Oslo where they made stained glass for windows. I believe this factory was in an area near or on Storgaden or Storgota Street.

Del dette innlegget


Lenke til innlegg
Del på andre sider
Gjest Hans Mathisen

Hello Pearl, here is a rough translation of the last 3 comments:Egil T.D.: points out that the norwegian word"glassmester" is "glarmester" in danish, the latter form being the original nordic form. In Iceland they have the word "glær", meaning transparent (like glass).Bjørn T.S.: "Oh, so this is the explanation for (the northern-norwegian) expression "glarholka"?", ("holke" is what you often get during winter time: slippery, icy surfaces on roades etc.) He goes on to say: "Many things fall into place as time goes by -...., Regards, Bjørn".Hans: "Thank you for the clarification!" (with a joke added to it that I can't translate). "It seems one never get to old to learn something new!. Friendly regards Hans".I hope my translation is good enough to show that you did not miss anything of importance to your original question. I am sorry not being able to help you on that. Let's hope others can! Good luck to you, anyway. Hans

Del dette innlegget


Lenke til innlegg
Del på andre sider
Gjest Jan Oldervoll

Norwegian lesson: Storgaden (or in modern Norwegian in Bergen Storgaten and in the rest of the country Storgata) litterally means Big Street or the equivalent of Main Street in US.

Del dette innlegget


Lenke til innlegg
Del på andre sider
Gjest Pearl Danroth

You have all been a great help. I am learning a little about the history, naming practices and the language of Norway. This all helps in tracing my "roots". Takk for hjelpen, Pearl

Del dette innlegget


Lenke til innlegg
Del på andre sider
Gjest Per Helge Seglsten

Hi Pearl! The joke might be translatede to something like: Thanks for the glar-ification, or Thanks for glaring this up for me, or something like that.Per Helge

Del dette innlegget


Lenke til innlegg
Del på andre sider
Gjest Pearl Danroth

The joke is clear to me now - clear as glass!! We, too, have the expression "glare ice", describing our roads in the winter. Now, I know where that expression came from! Pearl

Del dette innlegget


Lenke til innlegg
Del på andre sider

  • Hvem er aktive   0 medlemmer

    Ingen innloggede medlemmer aktive

×