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Carl-Henry Geschwind

Parents of Heinrich Sigismund Hassius, Oberbergamtsforvalter (died c. 1698)

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Carl-Henry Geschwind
Posted (edited)

For a brief biography of Heinrich (Henrik) Sigismund Hassius, see https://lokalhistoriewiki.no/wiki/Henrik_Sigismund_Hassius. His son Johan Sigismund Hassius was the notorious governor of Danish East India 1704-1718 and then was ennobled as Lillienpalm. Johan's daughter Anna Catharina Lillienpalm married Poul Christian Rye, ancestor of the military family Rye (discussed in an NST article in 1975). Through an illegitimate child of Poul Christian Rye's grandson Friderich Wilhelm Tuchsen, Heinrich Sigismund Hassius is also the ancestor of many farm families in Vik i Sogn (as well as descendants of farm emigrants from Vik to America, such as my girlfriend).

 

In the Norwegian literature, it has been known that Heinrich Sigismund was born around 1630 (said to be age 68 at his burial in 1698) and came around 1653 from Saxony with Berghauptmann Brostrup Gedde, but his exact origins were unknown. I believe I have found his parents. One key piece of evidence is that Carl Deichmann, on p. 204 of his 1777 history of the Kongsberg Sølvverk (in Kongelige danske videnskabernes selskab skrifter, ser. 1, bind 11, at https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=ien.35556000979591;view=1up;seq=232) says that Gedde "bragte med sig hiem Hofraad Hassii Søn".

 

There was indeed a Hofrat (court councilor; Hovråd in Swedish) Johannes Haß/Hassius in Electoral Saxony who died 1 May 1656; his wife, Elisabeth Tüntzel, daughter of Geheimrat (privy councilor) Gabriel Tüntzel, had died 21 September 1638 (the epitaphium, now destroyed, was recorded and published in 1709; see http://books.google.com/books?id=__A-AAAAcAAJ&pg=PA86&lpg=PA86&dq). This Hofrat Johannes Haß was granted a coat-of-arms on 19 September 1638, which looked like this (source: https://www.archivinformationssystem.at/detail.aspx?ID=2269611)

 

794201285_Hassiuscoat-of-arms-1.thumb.jpg.04439a3a1b6928f83632e5aafeaf130b.jpg

 

The key features are that the coat-of-arms contains two fields with six-sided stars alternating with two fields with lillies-of-the-valley (liljekonvall in Norwegian).

 

In 1678 Henrich Sigismund Hassius and his wife Anna Catharina Jurgens (already dead by then) donated a couple of fancy candlesticks (alterstaker) to Gamle Aker kirke. According to Ludv. Kr. Langbergs Oplysinger om Slegten Irgens fra Røros, s. 80, these alterstaker contained the following coat-of-arms:

 

701506279_HassiusIrgenscoat-of-arms-1.jpg.2f8a1b5f814bea74f0a93ba18affdd05.jpg

 

Note that the half of the coat-of-arms on the left (corresponding to Henrich Sigmund Hassius's coat-of-arms) is exactly the same as the one granted to Hofrat Johannes Haß/Hassius in 1638 - two six-sided stars alternating with two lillies-of-the-valley.

 

The coat-of-arms granted to Johan Sigismund Hassius when he was ennobled as Lillienpalm, incidentally, also contained two six-sided stars and one (not two) lillies-of-the-field in addition to a jaguar and a palm (see description at Danmarks Adels Aarbog, 19 (1902), s. 255).

 

Hofrat Johannes Haß/Hassius had at least two other sons, a Christianus Sigismundus Hassius (probably Christian Sigmund Haß in the original German) who composed a funeral poem for his grandfather Gabriel Tüntzel in 1646 and a Johann Sigismund Hassius, doctor of law, who died in 1665. Thus Hofrat Johannes Haß had a habit of giving the middle name Sigismund to his sons; moreover, Heinrich Sigismund Hassius's son Johan Sigismund Hassius (Lillienpalm) may very well have been named after Heinrich's brother.

Edited by Carl-Henry Geschwind

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Dag Thorsdalen

His burial in Kongsberg 17 Oct. 1698 as Hendich Simon Haßius, aged 68:

SAKO, Kongsberg kirkebøker, F/Fa/L0001: Parish register (official) no. I 1, 1696-1720, p. 203-204
Quick link: https://www.digitalarkivet.no/kb20070315660722 

 

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Per Nermo
Posted (edited)
På ‎28‎.‎04‎.‎2019 den 17.32, Carl-Henry Geschwind skrev:

 

For a brief biography of Heinrich (Henrik) Sigismund Hassius, see https://lokalhistoriewiki.no/wiki/Henrik_Sigismund_Hassius. His son Johan Sigismund Hassius was the notorious governor of Danish East India 1704-1718 and then was ennobled as Lillienpalm. Johan's daughter Anna Catharina Lillienpalm married Poul Christian Rye, ancestor of the military family Rye (discussed in an NST article in 1975). Through an illegitimate child of Poul Christian Rye's grandson Friderich Wilhelm Tuchsen, Heinrich Sigismund Hassius is also the ancestor of many farm families in Vik i Sogn (as well as descendants of farm emigrants from Vik to America, such as my girlfriend).

.....

.

What was the name of the illegitimate child of Poul Christian Rye's grandson Friderich Wilhelm Tuchsen [son of Poul's daughter Margrete Marie Rye (one of eight children) and Christian Fredrik Tuchsen (his 1st wife)] and who was the child's mother ?

.

Edited by Per Nermo

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Per Nermo
Posted (edited)
På ‎28‎.‎04‎.‎2019 den 17.32, Carl-Henry Geschwind skrev:

....

In the Norwegian literature, it has been known that Heinrich Sigismund was born around 1630 (said to be age 68 at his burial in 1698) and came around 1653 from Saxony with Berghauptmann Brostrup Gedde, but his exact origins were unknown. I believe I have found his parents. One key piece of evidence is that Carl Deichmann, on p. 204 of his 1777 history of the Kongsberg Sølvverk (in Kongelige danske videnskabernes selskab skrifter, ser. 1, bind 11, at https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=ien.35556000979591;view=1up;seq=232) says that Gedde "bragte med sig hiem Hofraad Hassii Søn".

 

There was indeed a Hofrat (court councilor; Hovråd in Swedish) Johannes Haß/Hassius in Electoral Saxony who died 1 May 1656; his wife, Elisabeth Tüntzel, daughter of Geheimrat (privy councilor) Gabriel Tüntzel, had died 21 September 1638 (the epitaphium, now destroyed, was recorded and published in 1709; see http://books.google.com/books?id=__A-AAAAcAAJ&pg=PA86&lpg=PA86&dq).

.....

 

.

This is indeed interesting !

 

Many (18) years ago I registered (alas, source not noted) (and wrongly, at that, seemingly !) that Oberbergamtforvalter Henrich Sigismund Hassius Hagerup (?) (ca.1628-1698) (married to a daugther of the Direktør ved Røros gruverAnna Catharina Johannesdatter Irgens (1640-1669) from Izehoe, Holstein) was the son of Richard Henriksen Hagerup, who died in Trondheim in 1674. 

 

(Richard had the son Peder Richardsen Hagerup (died 1707 i Trondheim), who fathered Richard (1657-1730) and Søren Hagerup (1667-1735)).

 

I do not know from where the informations origins that Henrich Sigismund Hassius was (supposed to be) a (danish ?) 'Hagerup'.

.

Edited by Per Nermo

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Per Nermo
Posted (edited)

.

Is it possible that Henrich Sigismund Hassius (Hagerup ?) (ca.1628-1698) was the father of Helle Andrea Henrichsdatter Hagerup (1671-1757), who married Johannes Henningsen Irgens (c1672-1751), who was a son of a brother (Henning) to above mentioned Anna Catharina Johannesdatter Irgens (1640-1669) ?

 

Helle grew up by her guardian Peder Richardsen Hagerup (not the one mentioned in above posting #4), bergskriver at Røros gruver (died 1693 in Sweden).

 

Another candidate as Helle's parent would be Anne Richardsdatter Hagerup (married to one 'Henrich'), a possible sister of Peder Richardsen Hagerup (the last mentioned), son of 'toller' in Vestnes, Romsdal, Richard Rickertsen Hagerup (c1604-1674) and Gjertrud Sørensdatter.

.

Edited by Per Nermo

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Ivar Moe
Posted (edited)

 

Parents of Anna Catharine Irgens ( What i belive is correct parents)

 

Henric Jurgens Irgens  born ab 1610  Itzenhoe,Holstein,Germany 

and Catherina Fruechtnichts born ab. 1610 Itzenhoe,Holstein,Germany . His father Jurgen Irgens b. 1585 in Amsterdam.

 

 

Edited by Ivar Moe

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Per Nermo
Posted (edited)
På ‎03‎.‎05‎.‎2019 den 23.21, Ivar Moe skrev:

 

Parents of Anna Catharine Irgens (what i belive is correct parents) :

Henric Jurgens Irgens  born ab. 1610 Itzenhoe, Holstein, Germany 

and Catherina Fruechtnichts born ab. 1610 Itzenhoe, Holstein, Germany. His father Jurgen Irgens b. 1585 in Amsterdam.

 

.

The merchant (in Izehoe ?) Henrich Jürgens (Irgens) and his wife Catharina Früchtnicht

indeed had a daughter Anna Catharina Irgens (I), who died 12 Mai 1699, but she was married to

Thomas Michael Hein, who was a professor in Roskilde.

 

Thus, she does not seem to be the same person as Anna Catharina Irgens (II) (1640-1669),

who married oberbergamtvforvalter Henrich Sigismund Hassius (c1628-1698).

 

ACI (II) is as far as I know a niece to ACI (I), being a daughter of the latter's brother

Johannes Irgens (1612-1659), who in 1651 became the 2nd 'direktør ved Røros koppergruver'.

.

Edited by Per Nermo

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Stig Nyberg


Thanks for all information about H. S. Hassius and his family!

 

But first, a couple of comments to the lokalhistoriewiki page:
Hassius was replaced by Jacob Mathias Tax as "bergmester og hytteforvalter nordafjells" in april
1656. His daughter Elisabeth married Michael Weichhart (sic!).

 

Tax and his two brothers were hired in Saxony in 1651/1652 by Brostrup Gedde, just as Hassius was.
Tax mentions in a letter to Johannes Barth dated Sept 18th 1668 his brother-in-law ("Schwager")
Hassius. This should probably not be taken literally, but rather as some family connection through
marriage. The wife of Tax, Christina Hohendorff/Hoffendorf/Hogendorp/Hugendörffen, born 1632, was
older than all Johannes Irgens' children with Elisabeth Arnisæus and could not be a sister of
Hassius' wife. But Christina could possibly be a daughter of Johannes from an earlier marriage.

If somebody could make matters clear, this would really be welcomed!

 

According to information found in "Danske Kanselli, Norske Innlegg" Hassius had been some years at
the coin production ("myntvesenet") of the Duke of Saxony.

 

Regards,
Stig A. Nyberg (co-author of "Bergmannsslekten Tax")

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Per Nermo
5 timer siden, Stig Nyberg skrev:

.....

Hassius was replaced by Jacob Mathias Tax as "bergmester og hytteforvalter nordafjells" in april
1656. His daughter Elisabeth married Michael Weichhart (sic!).

 

Tax and his two brothers were hired in Saxony in 1651/1652 by Brostrup Gedde, just as Hassius was.
Tax mentions in a letter to Johannes Barth dated Sept 18th 1668 his brother-in-law ("Schwager") Hassius.

This should probably not be taken literally, but rather as some family connection through marriage.

The wife of Tax, Christina Hohendorff/Hoffendorf/Hogendorp/Hugendörffen, born 1632,

was older than all Johannes Irgens' children with Elisabeth Arnisæus and could not be a sister of Hassius' wife.

But Christina could possibly be a daughter of Johannes from an earlier marriage.

If somebody could make matters clear, this would really be welcomed!

.....

.

Aldersmessig kunne jo Jacob Tax' hustru Christina Hohendorff (f. c1632) 'passe godt' som søster av Henrich Sigismund Hassius (f. c1628).

 

(En annen ting: Hva er bakgrunnen for ditt 'sic!' ('slik [står det (faktisk) skrevet] !') bak navnet Michael Weichhart ?)

.

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Stig Nyberg

Jeg skrev (sic!) for å markere at det er således Weichhart skal skrives (med to h'er).

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Carl-Henry Geschwind
Posted (edited)
On 5/3/2019 at 4:09 PM, Per Nermo said:

What was the name of the illegitimate child of Poul Christian Rye's grandson Friderich Wilhelm Tuchsen [son of Poul's daughter Margrete Marie Rye (one of eight children) and Christian Fredrik Tuchsen (his 1st wife)] and who was the child's mother ?

 

Margrete Fredriksdotter, baptised 12 Feb 1793 in Vik i Sogn: https://www.digitalarkivet.no/kb20070523640629, right-hand side, very bottom: "d. 12de døbt uægte barn, n: Margretha. Moderen Anna Siursdr. Wold [today's Voll], som ved daaben lod angive at Premier Lieutenant, Fredrich Wilhelm Tuchsen, var hendes barnefader."  Fadderen include 3 of her relatives as well as Sergeant Endre Trytte and Corporal Siur Sæbø from Tuchsen's company.

 

This was definitely a youthful indiscretion - Tuchsen was 22 at this time, and Anna Sjursdotter was barely 17 (born 27 Nov 1775 - see https://www.digitalarkivet.no/kb20070523640514, right-hand side, very bottom). In 1805 Anna married Ola Arnesson Stadem, who later became lensmand for Vik. In 1801 she was still living at home, and Margretha was listed as "fosterdatter" of Anna's father (see https://www.digitalarkivet.no/census/person/pf01058392000539). On 15 April 1813 (see https://www.digitalarkivet.no/kb20070523650053) Margrete married Ola Jonsson Hopperstad, who died in 1849. In the early 1850s all seven of their surviving children (some of whom had already had children of their own in Vik) emigrated to America (see Gudmund Balvoll, Gards- og ættesoge for Vik i Sogn, s. 194). On 19 October 1856 (see https://www.digitalarkivet.no/kb20070306620357) Margrete married for a second time, to widower Anbjørn Trulsson of Kvamme in Kvamsøy sokn. She died 2 December 1875 (see http://www.digitalarkivet.no/kb20070116330192).

Edited by Carl-Henry Geschwind

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Carl-Henry Geschwind
8 hours ago, Stig Nyberg said:

According to information found in "Danske Kanselli, Norske Innlegg" Hassius had been some years at
the coin production ("myntvesenet") of the Duke of Saxony.

 

Fascinating, Stig! Do you have a reference to the precise location in Norske Innlegg?

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Stig Nyberg

The following is a part of the Source References in "Bergmannsslekten Tax" (2009), written in Norwegian, which tells about Brostrup Geddes journey to Central Europe in 1651/52.

 

Brostrup Geddes studiereise:

MTB Kongsberg Sølvbergverk 1623  – 1723, s. 117, 118,  125; MTB kvartbind 6, s. 204; MTB kvartbind 13; RS, Kongsberg Sølvverk, Historie 2; DB, bergverk, bind 34. Inneholder dagboksnotater undertegnet Castitas (latin: anstendighet); Tyske Kanselli innenrikse avd., Bergverkssaker pk. 1513/23 – 1696, (RA); OBA, Kgl. resolusjoner og kollegialbrev pk. 1 for 1615 – 1794; DK, Norske Innlegg 1654 – 1657, filmrull 29/1953. Geddes forslag om J. Barth som overbergmester, 1656. Barths reise til "de fornemste bergverk i Tyskland, Bøhmen, Ungarn, Salzburg og Tirol" må ha vært sammen med Gedde i 1651/1652. Hassius hadde brev på å ha vært noen år ved myntvesenet til kurfyrsten av Sachsen; Vello Helk: Dansk-Norske studierejser; Et kartverk med stedsnavn fra 1645: Blaeu Atlas, nettutgave.

 

The source reference of interest here is: DK (=Danske Kanselli), Norske Innlegg 1654 - 1657, film roll 29/1953. Among other events, it mentions that "Hassius had a written confirmation telling he had been some years at the coin production owned by the Duke of Saxony".

Much has happened with the archives since the book was written. Much has been made accessible through Internet. If you are lucky, you may find it there.
 

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Per Nermo
Posted (edited)

.

(Ref. posting #4 above)

 

Anybody who knows what may have been the source for the seemingly wrong information 
that Henrich Sigismund Hassius (c1628 Sachsen? -1698 Kongsberg) was (supposed to be)

a son of (the dane ?) Richard Henriksen Hagerup (who died i Trondheim i 1674) ?

.

Edited by Per Nermo

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Stig Nyberg

One family site (Brynjulf Langballe's family tree) tells us that H. S. Hassius had a second
marriage about 1668, and his new wife was Anne Richardsdatter Hagerup. If so, this marriage would
probably have taken place in Gamle Aker church (to which HSH and his former wife had donated two
candlesticks) or, less probable, in Christiania. Church protocols from that period have been
preserved, and there should be a chance to find this marriage, if it really took place. Langballe
lists two or three daughters with the Hagerup surname.

 

I have seen Hassius several times in protocols from the mining industry, but never with the
Hagerup surname. His second forname was nearly always "Sigmund", not "Sigismund".
He was "overbergamtsforvalter", which probably means that he was the administrative leader of the
counsel ruling the mining industry in Norway. The professional leader was the "overberghauptmann",
who in 1670 was Johannes Barth. "Overbergamtet" moved from Christiania to Kongsberg in 1689.

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Per Nermo
Posted (edited)
6 timer siden, Stig Nyberg skrev:

....

One family site (Brynjulf Langballe's family tree) tells us that H. S. Hassius had a second
marriage about 1668, and his new wife was Anne Richardsdatter Hagerup. If so, this marriage would
probably have taken place in Gamle Aker church (to which HSH and his former wife had donated two
candlesticks) or, less probable, in Christiania. Church protocols from that period have been
preserved, and there should be a chance to find this marriage, if it really took place. Langballe
lists two or three daughters with the Hagerup surname.

....

.

'For all practical purposes' Gamle Aker kirke was located in 'Christiania', even though it was originally
located in the municipality of 'Gamle Aker' (north of  the 'Grensen' street, and surrounding  'old Christiania').

 

The four churches indicated in below map of Christiania are (from top to bottom)

- Gamle Aker kirke

- St. Olavs kirke (Catholic)

- Trefoldighetskirken ('Trinity Church')

- Domkirken / Vår Frelsers kirke ('Our Savior's Church').

 

The Royal Palace  at the far left, at the top of Carl Johans gate.

 

Churches Christiania.gif

Edited by Per Nermo

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Per Nermo
Posted (edited)
7 timer siden, Stig Nyberg skrev:

.....

One family site (Brynjulf Langballe's family tree) tells us that H. S. Hassius had a second
marriage about 1668, and his new wife was Anne Richardsdatter Hagerup. If so, this marriage would
probably have taken place in Gamle Aker church (to which HSH and his former wife had donated two
candlesticks) or, less probable, in Christiania. Church protocols from that period have been
preserved, and there should be a chance to find this marriage, if it really took place. Langballe
lists two or three daughters with the Hagerup surname.

.....

.

In above posting #5, I mention Anne Richardsdatter Hagerup (married to one 'Henrich'),

and it's of cource extreemly tempting to suggest that this 'Henrich' may in fact have been Henrich Sigismund Hassius,

and that this couple had the daughter

  •  Helle Andrea Hagerup (1671-1757), married in 1697 to Johannes Henningsen Irgens, sogneprest in Loppa and Holtålen

and maybe also

  •  Sara Henriksdatter Hagerup (c1675 - after 1734), married in 1704 to Niels Aagesen Find,   and
  •  Gjertrud Henriksdotter Hagerup (c1670-1755), married c1693? to hyttemester Ole Pedersen Dybdal  in Holtålen.

 

This alleged 2nd marriage (in appr. 1668) between Henrich Sigismund Hassius and Anne Richardsdatter Hagerup matches poorly, though,

with the fact that the candlesticks (alterstaker) in Gamle Aker kirke (donated in 1678) carries the name of HHS's wife Anna Catharina Irgens  (posting #1).

 

(I see, to my mild astonishment, that  Langballe  gives my own web site as his source for HHS' 'Spouse 2'.

I do NOT, however, list Anne Richardsdatter Hagerup as the wife of Henrich Sigismund Hassius.)

.

Edited by Per Nermo

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Stig Nyberg

In the map in #17, only Gamle Aker and Domkirken are relevant in this context. The other two were
finished in the 1850's. Gamle Aker congregation in the 1600's also included Akershus fortress,
where representatives of the civilian and military power were located.Since the mining industry
was of great military importance, "Overbergamtet" may well have been located in this area,
explaining why Hassius gave the candlesticks to Gamle Aker.

Has Anna Catharina Irgens' death i 1669 been confirmed by reliable sources? If so, it seems
strange if HSH and his deceased first wife gave the candlesticks i 1678 if he had a new wife by
then.

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Per Nermo
Posted (edited)
34 minutter siden, Stig Nyberg skrev:

.....

Has Anna Catharina Irgens' death i 1669 been confirmed by reliable sources ?
If so, it seems strange if HSH and his deceased first wife gave the candlesticks i 1678 if he had a new wife by then.

 

.

  a)   Her burial is supposed to have taken place in Aker on March 12th, 1669. Perhaps in Gamle Aker church ?  I've not seen the KB entry myself.

  b)   I agree (ref. 2nd last paragraph in #18).

.

Edited by Per Nermo

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Carl-Henry Geschwind
Posted (edited)
56 minutes ago, Per Nermo said:

Her burial is supposed to have taken place in Aker on March 12th, 1669. Perhaps in Gamle Aker church ?  I've not seen the KB entry myself

 

https://www.digitalarkivet.no/kb20060217020440 (right-hand page, left column).

 

The entry reads: "[Martius] 12. Ober Berg amtforvalter Hasii quinde til ager, med alle kl: oc den . . . [størst?]."

 

So the entry itself does not actually give her name. The only direct evidence we have that Henrich Hassius was married to Anna Catharina Irgens, as far as I can tell, is the inscription on the candlesticks (there is also the indirect evidence that Henrich in 1685 owned 3 1/2 shares in Røros kobberverk, which earlier had been owned by the Irgens family) - and yes, it also strikes me as weird that those were not donated until 1678. 

Edited by Carl-Henry Geschwind

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Carl-Henry Geschwind

For those who might be interested, here are the ancestors of Henrich Sigismund Hassius that I have been able to identify from primary sources available on the internet (these include funeral sermons and university matriculation records as well as burgher lists, tax lists, lists of inscriptions and epitaphia, and published legal documents for the city of Leipzig). Detailed references are available on request; many are also linked in my ancestry.com tree at https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/person/tree/115335600/.

 

Parents' generation

2) Johannes Hassius (or Johann Haße) - born in early 1590s (said to be age 17 in winter 1610/11). Recorded as student at Leipzig 1610/11, Gießen 1614, and Basel 1617/18. In all student records listed as being from Haina (today's Großenhain in Saxony). By 1638 had received a doctorate in law (both civil and religious) and had risen to Hofrat (legal counselor) at the court of the Elector of Saxony in Dresden. September 1638 knighted by the Holy Roman Emperor. By early 1640s owned the manor (Rittergut) of Schletta (about 3 km west-southwest of Meißen) as well as that of Segrena (possibly Seegrehna, about 6 km west-southwest of Wittenberg). Johannes died 1 May 1656 and was buried at St. Sophien, the court's church in Dresden.

 

3) His wife Elisabeth Tüntzel (mother of Johannes's ten children) died 21 September 1638, according to their joint epitaphium at St. Sophien.

 

Grandparents' generation

4) I have found two direct records for Johannes Hassius's father Stephan Haße: In 1614 his son Johannes dedicated a student publication to him, and in 1621 he was involved in a legal dispute as owner of the manor of Schletta (which Johannes later owned). According to the funeral sermon of one of Johannes Hassius's children, Stephan was the son of Hans Haß, who was supposed to have been a master hunter (Jägermeister) in the services of the king of Hungary, and his wife Anna von Moschwitz, but I have found no documentation for these two.

 

5) According to funeral sermons for two of Johannes Hassius's children, Stephan was married to a Magdalena Patzschke. I have found no other information about her.

 

6) Elisabeth Tüntzel's father Gabriel Tüntzel was born in the mid-1570s (said to be age 17 in summer 1593) in the city of Halle. In 1588 he was inscribed at the university of Leipzig, from which he received his bachelor of arts degree in 1593 and master of arts degree in January 1595. By 1604 he was son-in-law to the university's senior professor of theoloogy, and in summer 1605, while attending law school there, he served as the university's rector. He received a doctorate in law (both civil and religious) in March 1609. In 1610 he served as Hofrat (legal counselor) at the court of the minor state of Sachsen-Weimar, but by 1613 he had entered into the services of the Elector of Saxony in Dresden, for whom he carried out a number of diplomatic missions. He became a member of the Elector's privy council (Geheimrat) in 1637. He was knighted in 1622 and that year had acquired a manor in Seeligstadt; by 1645 he owned three other manors, of which the main one was in Tunzenhausen. He died 21 December 1645.

 

7) His wife (and mother of his children) was Catharina Schilter, who (according to her son's funeral sermon) died 1627.

 

Great-grandparents' generation

14) Catharina Schilter's father Zacharias Schilter was born in Leipzig in 1541 (a source from 1620 gave the birthdate as 25 May). He received a bachelor of arts degree in 1557/58 and a master of arts degree in January 1562 from the university in Leipzig, as well as a bachelor of theology in October 1567 and a doctor of theology in May 1573. As early as 1568 he had become professor of Hebrew at the university, and in 1572 he received a regular appointment as professor of theology. He served as rector of the university for four semesters, as well as dean of the theological faculty from 1592. In 1581 he was appointed to the consistory for the Leipzig region and served as inspector of various schools in the area. Wrote a number of theological treatises. He died in Leipzig 4 July 1604, five days after suffering a stroke in church.

 

15) His wife Elisabeth Cantzler, whom he married in 1570, was born July 1551 in Leipzig. She died there 30 October 1611 after having suffered from a fever for the better part of a month.

 

Great-great-grandparents' generation

28) Zacharias Schilter's father Maternus Schilter was made a burgher of Leipzig in May 1541. At this point he was said to be the son of a burgher, but I have found no primary source identifying his father (published genealogies since about 1905 have said his father was Hans Schilter, who married the daughter of a prominent and long-established Nürnberg family, but I have not found any evidence for this). Maternus was a master furrier, and he trained his son Andreas to follow him in the trade.

 

29) His wife (according to Zacharias Schilter's funeral sermon) was Catharina Teuber.

 

30) Elisabeth Cantzler's father Johannes Cantzler was born in the early 1520s (said to be age 58 in early 1580). When he was made a burgher of Leipzig in November 1549 he was said to be the son of a burgher; unfortunately, there are several Cantzlers in Leipzig in the early 1500s who could have been his father. According to his childrens' funeral sermons, he was a member of the Leipzig city council. He died 3 January 1580.

 

31) His wife (according to their childrens' funeral sermons) was Elisabeth Schiltel.

 

3-great-grandparents' generation

58) Catharina Teuber's father (according to her son Zacharias Schilter's funeral sermon) was Nickel Teuber. He was made a burgher of Leipzig in December 1502. In 1524 he was among 105 Leipzig burghers who signed a petition for a Lutheran preacher to be allowed to preach within the city walls (this petition was rejected by the duke). In November 1527 he was recorded as chief master (Obermeister) of the Leipzig shoemaker's guild. He was assessed tax for the war against the Turks in 1529; the third installment of the tax, which was due in May 1532, was paid by his (unnamed) widow, indicating that he had died by then.

 

61) Johannes Cantzler's mother was identified in the funeral sermons of two of his children as Barbara Erckel, the sister of Ulrich Erckel (the younger) of Marienberg (in the Erzgebirge or ore mountains along the border between Saxony and Bohemia). No further information on her, but Ulrich is well-known for having become immensely wealthy in the silver mining boom of the early 1500s and then donating a lot of his wealth upon his death in 1543.

 

62) Elisabeth Schiltel's father Georg Schiltel was born in Hahnbach (about 11 km north-northwest of Amberg in what is now Bavaria) sometime in the 1470s. In 1496 he enrolled at the university in Leipzig, from which he received a bachelor of arts degree in September 1498 and a master of arts degree in December 1501. He stayed on as instructor until 1505, then left for medical studies. He returned in January 1512 with medical degree in hand from the university of Bologna and was accepted into the medical faculty at Leipzig, where he served as professor of physiology until 1543 and professor of therapeutics thereafter. From 1512 to 1516 he was also employed as doctor by the Leipzig city council, and in 1525 he was personal physician to the duke of Saxony. In 1529 he attended a dying humanist at the university of Wittenberg, earning praise two years later in a letter from Martin Luther. He made enough money from his medical practice to buy the manor of Abtneudorf just outside Leipzig in 1542. He died 15 June 1545 (his grave inscription, since destroyed, was mis-transcribed as 1541 in a 1686 publication).

 

63) His wife Anna Huter was born in the early 1500s (said to be age 73 in 1575). They became engaged in summer 1518, when he was in his 40s and she was about 16; they married in 1519. According to the funeral sermon of her granddaughter, she died 1575.

 

4-great-grandparents' generation

122) Barbara Erckel's father Ulrich Erckel (the elder) was first recorded in Nuremberg in 1474. By 1475 he was already involved in trading silver from mines in Thuringia, and in 1482 he and his partner Georg Holzschuher, who owned shares in the newly opened silver mines of the Saxon Erzgebirge, received the monopoly for supplying silver to the mint of Bern. Ulrich and Georg also traded in goods made of brass, but in 1484 the city council of Nuremberg shut down their brass production for violating guild labor regulations. In response, by August 1485 they established a new brass wire mill in the small mountain village of Unterneubrunn, near the copper deposits of Ilmenau in Thuringia. Ulrich continued to live in Nuremberg, where he was a member of the city assembly and where he purchased real estate in 1490. He also continued international trading activities; in 1502 and again in 1505 he appeared in Antwerpen to sell copper and brass wire. In 1505 Ulrich gave up his rights as burgher of Nuremberg and moved to Thuringia. A year before he had replaced his partner Georg Holzschuher with the Semler family, who owned interests in copper mines and copper smelters in Thuringia. By 1507 Ulrich himself owned a share in the Ilmenau copper mine, and beginning in 1509 he attached his seal to a number of documents there. In 1513 he was once again in Antwerpen to sell brass products. Soon thereafter Ulrich's sons dissolved their partnership with the Semlers. Ulrich last sealed a document in Ilmenau in 1518. According to an account from 1621, he was buried in the church at Unterneubrunn (whose erection he and his first partner Georg had financed in 1490).

 

126) It is unclear when Anna Huter's father Hans Huter was born. His grave inscription claimed he was 114 years old when he died in 1552 (implying birth in the late 1430s), and his son later even claimed that he had reached age 124. I believe it more likely that he was born in the 1450s or early 1460s. He was made a burgher of Leipzig in February 1492, and sometime thereafter he took over the residence and shop of apothecary Georg Huter, who (according to a 1490 document) had been his cousin (not his father, as claimed in some genealogies). Hans was a member of Leipzig's city council from 1505 to 1550, serving as tax collector in 1511 and as "building master" (in charge of public works) from 1518 to 1535. In 1523 he was appointed as one of the church wardens for St. Thomas, one of the two main parishes in Leipzig. He died 3 October 1552.

 

127) His second wife (the first having died in June 1499) and mother of his children was Elisabeth Preußer, who died 12 March 1548.

 

5-great-grandparents' generation

254) According to her great-granddaughter's 1611 funeral sermon, Elisabeth Preußer's father was Johannes Preußer (this is supported by the coat-of-arms on the epitaphium for Elisabeth and her husband). In 1457 he entered the university in Leipzig, from which he obtained a bachelor of arts degree in May 1464. By early 1472 he had also received a doctorate in civil law. He was made a burgher of Leipzig in 1472/73. In 1479 he became a member of the city council, but in 1482 had to forego his pay because he had accepted employment as the duke's bailiff (Amtmann) for the Leipzig district. By 1485 he apparently had resigned his ducal position, as he once again re-entered the council and was being paid, but by 1490 he had once again accepted a position as the duke's bailiff, now for the district of Zörbig, a position he still held in 1506. He continued to live in Leipzig and also administered the manors and other properties inherited from his father. He may have been dead by 1508, when a new bailiff was appointed for Zörbig; he was definitely dead by 1515, when his son received his inheritance.

 

255) I have not yet found any primary source giving the name of Johannes's wife, but a 1483 document shows that she was the sister of Balthasar Schultz the younger. She was already his wife in 1479, when he collected a debt owed to her. She also appeared in winter 1481/82 when she was fined for sledding inside city limits (a boisterous activity that was considered a disturbance of the peace).

 

6-great-grandparents' generation

508) Johannes Preußer's father Kunz Bruser was, according to a 1453 document, the nephew of a Hans Bruser (not his son, as claimed in some genealogies). Kunz first appeared in the record in 1438 when, as a burgher of Leipzig, he bought two manors near Leipzig as well as a concession for collecting customs duties on fish (which he sold back in 1445). He bought another manor in 1443 and two more properties in 1453. By 1452 he was serving on the Leipzig city council. He was still alive in 1465 when the new joint dukes of Saxony confirmed his title in 4 manors and some additional farmland; he was dead by 1473 when his sons sold one of the properties inherited from him. His wife was named as Elisabeth in 1453 when she was granted a life estate in one of his properties; it is unclear to me whether she was the same as the unnamed wife who received a life estate in 1438 and thus was the mother of his children.

 

510) Johannes Preußer's father-in-law Balthasar Schultz (the elder) first appeared in the record in 1460, when he and his brother Hans were given a bequest by a theology professor at the university in Leipzig. Balthasar and Hans in the 1470s (after considerable fighting) divided ownership of a manor and some wood- and meadowlands just outside Leipzig. The manor in 1432 had been owned by four members of the Schultz family, any one of whom might have been Balthasar's father. In December 1479 Balthasar endowed a number of masses for the souls of family members, including his first wife Margarethe Stuß. His second (unnamed) wife was apparently a close relative (perhaps sister?) of Johann Schober, Leipzig's mayor in the 1470s, as Balthasar's children (including Johannes's wife) were named as Johann's "closest heirs" in 1483. Balthasar was recorded as dead by March 1487.

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Carl-Henry Geschwind
On 5/5/2019 at 6:49 AM, Stig Nyberg said:

The source reference of interest here is: DK (=Danske Kanselli), Norske Innlegg 1654 - 1657, film roll 29/1953

 

Found it. Recommendation by Brostrup Gedde, undated but resulting in appointments dated 20 Apr 1656, in Norske Indlæg 1656 at https://www.sa.dk/ao-soegesider/da/billedviser?epid=19981101#271928,51793431.

 

Thanks again!

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Stig Nyberg

About the burial Mar 12 1669: It took place from Christiania cathedral, but the
words "til ager" (to Aker) indicates that she was actually buried i Aker.

 

But who was she? I tend to believe that she was Anna Catharina Irgens after all. It
seems that the rich and ruthless owner of the Røros copper mines, Joachim Irgens,
tried to establish connections through  marriage to important persons within the
Norwegian mining industry. Hassius was one such person, Jacob Mathias Tax another.
The latter often critizised the conditions at Røros, so in order to "tame" him
Irgens may have tried to include him in the family. This may explain why Tax called
Hassius "brother-in-law" in 1668. There exists a beautiful picture of Tax' wife
Christina. Her suit is supposed to be from northern Germany. Itzehoe would fit
nicely...

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Stig Nyberg

A possible explanation to the engravements on the donated candlesticks could be something like this: Hassius and Anna Catharina Irgens got the candlesticks (without "1678") as a wedding present, one for the bridegroom and one for the bride. Long after Annas death Hassius donated them to the church, perhaps because he intended a new marriage. "1678" was then engraved to mark the time for the donation.

 

I have heard that the candlesticks were stolen from the church some time ago, but one was later found hidden on the graveyard near by.

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