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Request for help locating great-grandfather in Larvik in mid-1800s


Louise Ober

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For historic context, this kind of escape was not that uncommon. Several of my husband's male relatives left for America for the same reason. 1848 was the start year of the Three year war, or the The first Schleswigian war. Norway was in a union with Denmark at the time, so Norwegian troops were readied for a fight. 

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53 minutter siden, Inger Hohler skrev:

1848 was the start year of the Three year war, or the The first Schleswigian war. Norway was in a union with Denmark at the time, so Norwegian troops were readied for a fight. 

 

The union with Denmark ended in 1814!

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Perhaps the word "union" is not quite the right description of the relationship of Norway and Denmark at the time referred to by Inger. Wikipedia uses the words "friend and supporter"  of Denmark against the Kingdom of Prussia. 

 

"In foreign affairs, Oscar I was a friend of the principle of nationality; in 1848 he supported Denmark against the Kingdom of Prussia in the First War of Schleswig by placing Swedish and Norwegian troops in cantonments in Funen and North Schleswig (1849–1850), and was the mediator of the Truce of Malmö (26 August 1848). He was also one of the guarantors of the integrity of Denmark (the London Protocol, 8 May 1852).[11]"

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oscar_I_of_Sweden

 

However I would not object to the words "informal union" to describe the relationship indicated by the paragraph from Wikipedia. 

 

 

Edited by Anton Hagelee
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If we have a candidate for William Henry Brown in Hans Hansen Lindhjem and I think we do, perhaps some information can be obtained by looking at a bygdebok. I see there are 3 volumes of Tjølling bygdebok by J. W. Krohn-Holm. 

 

I wonder if someone can access one of these volume, find the chapter on the Lindhjem farm and see if any information exists on the child Hans Hansen born in 1832. Best of course would be to find out if he emigrated to America and if so where in America he went?

 

https://apps.library.und.edu/bygdebok/place/368

 

At the marriage of the parents Hans Sorensen and Maren Sophia Hansdatter, Hans used the farm name Lindhjem even tho the marriage took place in Hedrum parish. 

 

The married pair are found on the Lindhjem østre farm in 1865 and 1875 Census 

 

https://www.digitalarkivet.no/en/census/person/pf01038121002431

 

https://www.digitalarkivet.no/en/census/person/pf01052153003086

 

 

Edited by Anton Hagelee
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3 timer siden, Anton Hagelee skrev:

If we have a candidate for William Henry Brown in Hans Hansen Lindhjem and I think we do, perhaps some information can be obtained by looking at a bygdebok. I see there are 3 volumes of Tjølling bygdebok by J. W. Krohn-Holm. 

 

I wonder if someone can access one of these volume, find the chapter on the Lindhjem farm and see if any information exists on the child Hans Hansen born in 1832. Best of course would be to find out if he emigrated to America and if so where in America he went?

 

No information on a son Hans born 1832:

 

image.thumb.png.6793141c71e0e18d5ab2b37da4579d02.png

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I should stop writing messages late at night... Of course our union in 1849 was with Sweeden, which was loosely allied with Denmark.

Norske gårdsbruk, Vestfold 2 https://www.nb.no/items/d7b6a8abeb13ea838d26df0aeb6badab?page=595
says Lingum Østre is part of the original Linheim farm (same farm number, 64).
It also says that the family who lived there at least from 1593 until some time into the 1900's no longer had descendants to take over the farm. It was sold to someone called Henry Skaraaseie, who the sold it to Mathis Wittersø who belonged to 'a younger branch of the family" i 1945. He bought it on 'odel', which meant he had to prove he was closely related to a recent, former owner who had lived there for some considerable time.

There is a Geni page for Mathis Wittersø administrated by a Lindhjem
https://www.geni.com/people/Mathis-Wittersø/6000000083998698191

 

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På 14.6.2022 den 18.25, Richard Olsen skrev:

Here is what I found in the general area in Norway:

1. Henrik Vilhelm Bruun, born 1807 in Kristiansand, married 1837 in Agder (these places are in bordering counties). Possible candidate for William Henry Brown's father. I don't know if they ever lived in Larvik.

 

Marriage in Egersund, Rogaland 1837:

 

https://www.digitalarkivet.no/en/view/327/pv00000001016159

Egersund sokneprestkontor, SAST/A-101807/S08/L0009: Ministerialbok nr. A 9, 1827-1850, s. 367
Brukslenke for sidevisning: https://www.digitalarkivet.no/kb20051208010654

 

Daughter born 1838 in Mandal, Vest-Agder: 

 

https://www.digitalarkivet.no/view/255/pd00000036754287

Mandal sokneprestkontor, SAK/1111-0030/F/Fa/Faa/L0011: Ministerialbok nr. A 11, 1830-1839, s. 107
Brukslenke for sidevisning: https://www.digitalarkivet.no/kb20060106030808


Daughter born 1840 in Egersund, Rogaland:

https://www.digitalarkivet.no/view/255/pd00000002375316

Egersund sokneprestkontor, SAST/A-101807/S08/L0009: Ministerialbok nr. A 9, 1827-1850, s. 101
Brukslenke for sidevisning: https://www.digitalarkivet.no/kb20051208010374

 

Daughter born 1842 in Arendal, Aust-Agder (her father died before baptism):

https://www.digitalarkivet.no/view/255/pd00000038224583

Øyestad sokneprestkontor, SAK/1111-0049/F/Fa/L0013: Ministerialbok nr. A 13, 1827-1842, s. 191
Brukslenke for sidevisning: https://www.digitalarkivet.no/kb20060113040192

 

According to a GENI-profile, HWB' father was born in Larvikhttps://www.geni.com/people/Henrik-Wilhelm-Wright-Bruun/6000000011300076328

 

Should we search for a possible birth of an illegitimate son (William Henry ca 1832), before his marriage in Egersund 1837?

Edited by Gry.Onarheim.Dahlmo
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9 hours ago, Gry.Onarheim.Dahlmo said:

Should we search for a possible birth of an illegitimate son (William Henry ca 1832), before his marriage in Egersund 1837?

 

That would be useful. Especially if he had a son around 1830 to 1834.

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10 hours ago, Gry.Onarheim.Dahlmo said:

No information on a son Hans born 1832:

 

That's a bummer! According to the obit posted by Sven, he had 8 children total. Only two alive in 1885 when he died. A daughter, assume Anne Malene and a son in America. 

 

Following the 1865 Census, he also had 

 

Søren Hansen born around 1830

 

Inger P Hansdatter born around 1844

 

Henrik M Hansen born around 1849

 

Ancestry turns up 

 

Maren Kirstine Hansen born 1839

 

Inger Petraea Hansen  born 1842

 

A second Anne Malene, credit to Sven. The info not the child😀

 

The two Anne Malene, one born in 1834 and one born in 1836l

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Anton Hagelee
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5 minutter siden, Anton Hagelee skrev:

Still missing one. 

 

He had 2 x Anne Malene...

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6 minutes ago, Richard Olsen said:

Check bottom of page...Dim. Straffannge

 

I was trying to stay out of this, but nobody else found this record.

 

Posted back on page one by Ivar Moe

 

"And we also have this former convict, the (ship's) carpenter who apparently lives in Boston

 

https://www.digitalarkivet.no/view/8/pe00000000021158

 

 

Maybe it's possible to find him in the criminal record/index

 

Probably the same man in 1887

 

https://www.digitalarkivet.no/view/8/pe00000001015721"

 

 

 

Edited by Anton Hagelee
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49 minutter siden, Anton Hagelee skrev:

 

Maybe it's possible to find him in the criminal record/index

The original source does not contain this information. 

First line on top:

 

Akershus, Oslo fylke, Emigrantprotokoll nr. 11 (1883-1885)
Permanent bilde-ID: em20110222660807
Brukslenke for sidevisning: https://www.digitalarkivet.no/em20110222660807
Permanent bildelenke: https://urn.digitalarkivet.no/URN:NBN:no-a1450-em20110222660807.jpg

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The link I provided gives the original source as Emigranter over Kristiania 1867-1927, tilleggsliste

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21 minutes ago, Sven Hjortland said:

The original source does not contain this information. 

First line on top:

 

Akershus, Oslo fylke, Emigrantprotokoll nr. 11 (1883-1885)
Permanent bilde-ID: em20110222660807
Brukslenke for sidevisning: https://www.digitalarkivet.no/em20110222660807
Permanent bildelenke: https://urn.digitalarkivet.no/URN:NBN:no-a1450-em20110222660807.jpg

 

Sorry Sven, I was just reposting the original link by Ivar Moe. I was not looking for any further information. My bad.

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I am at a complete loss for words – ALL of you guys are truly amazing!!!!  Even if this Hans Hansen  Lindhjem turns out not my relative (although I am holding my breath that he may be!), your sleuthing abilities and perseverance are extraordinary!  Wow. I am so grateful!

 

I was actually in the process of reviewing Ivar’s original comments from the first page, and was wondering if we had perhaps overlooked them. I think Ivar's reference to a William Brown “convict” threw me off, because, of course, I didn't think he was a criminal! 😔 

 

Is the “convict” reference Ivar made because of the word "straffange" at the bottom?

I guess this would make sense if, according to Inger, Hans had been “wanted” for running away (a fugitive) from a war conscription in the 1848-50 time frame?  

 

Also, Sven noted a departure for Arendal in 1848 - which could make sense if Hans took the Bellona from Arendal to Boston that arrived September 5, 1850 (instead of the Larvik-NY trip in April).

 

The other noteworthy connection is that in the article Inger found, Hans's birth date is listed as Feb 12, 1832, which interestingly, is that same date written on his death certificate in Boston in 1919. The pieces are coming together!  

 

(I will add more later today.) 👏

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Hi Louise & others!
 
I've read through all the posts in this topic and a couple of questions arise;
 
1. In your first post Louise, you wrote; "when he arrived in the US in 1850, he used the name William Henry Brown". I cannot see any sources presented using the name Henry, only H. Additionally, I've looked through various sources on Ancestry and FS regarding marriage, census', children's birth & death registration, naturalization etc. and he is only listed with an H, not Henry. Maybe I'm "blind", but where have you found the name Henry? Please, enlighten us.
 
2. As correctly pointed out by Mr. Richard Olsen, the William Brown found in Gloucester, Essex Co, MA in census 1855 & 1860 (along with Jacob & James) is not your great-grandfather. In 1860 (LINK), there's however one other William Brown from Norway, living in Gloucester, born ca 1832, fisherman (Ancestry has wrongly transcribed him as born in Nova Scotia - scanned original states Norway, FS has it correct). This could be your great-grandfather. But where was he in 1855? 
 
The information he submitted in the Petition in 1869, was that he arrived in New York in March 1850. Subsequently there should be a chance of finding him in the census of 1850 since the official date of the census was June 1, 1850. However, completed census forms indicate that the surveys continued to be made throughout the rest of the year (Source; Wikipedia). I have not found a William H Brown in MA or NY in 1850 that fits. The reason for not locating him in 1850, 1855 (or even 1860) is probably because he went by another name. 
 
Your great-grandfather married Melissa A Morgan in Ashby, Middlesex Co, MA 2nd March 1861, and in Ashby is where their first two children were born. It's also where Melissa & her family were located in 1860 (LINK), census date 3rd August 1860. One should think your great-grandfather at least lived somewhere in MA in 1860, being that the couple married seven months post census for Melissa.
 
As for the candidate @Anton Hagelee found; Hans Hansen Lindhjem - I believe it's an interesting candidate. He migrated from Tjølling in 1848 to Arendal?, and just to be sure of the full text, I've posted it on the forum; Transcription of scanned sources (LINK).
 
@Inger Hohler found in the newspaper 22nd December 1854, which was also posted on the 27th same month and 1st January 1855 (LINK), that he was wanted for failing to appear in the Hedrumske Kompagni Af Tjøllings Præstegjeld. Hans Hansen Lindhjem was probably long gone by then. 
 
There's a Hantz Hanson, 18 years (born ca 1832), mariner, in the 1850 census NY (census date 11 or 16th September - LINK). Could this be Hans Hansen Lindhjem? Could it be that he changed his name to William H Brown, the  being Hans or Hansen?
 
If we take a look at the obituary @Sven Hjortland found, it has an interesting paragraph (LINK to Dagbladet 28th March 1885 - different newspaper than Sven found, but same text & easier to read). "Ligesom han ikke var syg før i den sidste tid, bevarede han ogsaa sine Aandsevner til det sidste, saa han lige til for faa Aar siden selv skrev brev til sin Søn i Amerika". Quick translation; "He wasn't ill until recently and retained his mental ability through till the end. It was only a few years ago he wrote letters to his son in America". So, there was definitely communication between father (+ family in Norway) and son, thus it makes sense his son (Hans Hansen aka William Brown?) went to see the family in 1885. Hans Sørensen Lindhjem died 16th March, and William Brown travelled back 6th August 1885. In the newspaper Jarlsberg og Larviks Amtstidende, Thursday 9. juli 1885 (LINK) an auction of movable property was announced for the 16th July, requested by the legal heirs of Hans Sørensen's (and his late wife) probate. The auction was to take place at Østre Lindhjem, Thor Andersen's home.
 
Unfortunately, the scanned death register (death protocol) for Tjølling starts in 1886 (LINK). However, a probate record hopefully exists, not scanned though, hence I've taken the liberty of making an inquiry of such from the Archives. Let's hope it will give some answers.
Edited by Egil Johannessen
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20 timer siden, Gry.Onarheim.Dahlmo skrev:

No information on a son Hans born 1832:

 

image.thumb.png.6793141c71e0e18d5ab2b37da4579d02.png

 

9 timer siden, Anton Hagelee skrev:

That's a bummer! According to the obit posted by Sven, he had 8 children total. Only two alive in 1885 when he died. A daughter, assume Anne Malene and a son in America.

 

9 timer siden, Sven Hjortland skrev:

 

Some bygdebok-authors omitted children assumed to have died as children, probably to shorten the text. But in this case, the assumption that Hans died as a child, seems to be wrong.

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8 timer siden, Richard Olsen skrev:

https://www.digitalarkivet.no/view/8/pe00000000021158

 

Check bottom of page...Dim. Straffannge

 

8 timer siden, Anton Hagelee skrev:

Maybe it's possible to find him in the criminal record/index

 

7 timer siden, Sven Hjortland skrev:

The original source does not contain this information. 

First line on top:

 

Akershus, Oslo fylke, Emigrantprotokoll nr. 11 (1883-1885)
Permanent bilde-ID: em20110222660807
Brukslenke for sidevisning: https://www.digitalarkivet.no/em20110222660807
Permanent bildelenke: https://urn.digitalarkivet.no/URN:NBN:no-a1450-em20110222660807.jpg

 

7 timer siden, Richard Olsen skrev:

The link I provided gives the original source as Emigranter over Kristiania 1867-1927, tilleggsliste

 

6 timer siden, Louise Ober skrev:

Is the “convict” reference Ivar made because of the word "straffange" at the bottom?

I guess this would make sense if, according to Inger, Hans had been “wanted” for running away (a fugitive) from a war conscription in the 1848-50 time frame?  

 

The Dim. straffange (or released prisoner) note does not refer to William Brown.

 

In the original protocol, this is found on the previous page (496), as a note regarding Ole Olsen (seventh from bottom): https://www.digitalarkivet.no/em20110222660806

 

By mistake, the database has this note for the last seven persons on page 496 and the eleven first persons on page 497.

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In addition to William Brown not being called a convict in the original protocol: Most likely, he never faced any legal consequence for evading military service.
If he had changed his name, Norwegian officials would not have known what William Brown was called before he emigrated. 
Even if a local official figured out who he was, he would also have to remembered that this person had evaded military service. 

Even if he remembered, the local official would have to be quite zealous to pursue the matter many years later, well after the war had ended. Putting someone in prison is costly.
 

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